September & Early October Overview of all the main Political Stories

ThePoliticsView has had a short hiatus during the months of September and October. The reasons being the editor took time off to amend personal matters.

This blog should provide an overview of the main political stories that have occurred since the last published article, when Diane James was appointed the new UKIP leader back in early September.

Speaking of which, she has ended up stepping down from the UKIP leadership role just 18 days after being elected. She reportedly felt hard done by as leader, meaning she couldn’t coney her opinions freely within the party. Nigel Farage has stood in as temporary leader until a new leader is elected over the coming weeks.

The favourite Steven Woolfe has recently been out into hospital after a psychical altercation with another party MEP in Strasbourg. An investigation is now underway to deal with the issue, but Mr Woolfe has now been sent home from the hospital and is recovering well. He’s still considering running for UKIP leadership status as well as MEP Bill Etheridge who came 3rd behind Lisa Duffy and Diane James respectively in the last UKIP leadership election.

Theresa May and her new UK government have solidified the promised Brexit outcome from June’s referendum result by announcing article 50 will be triggered by early next March in 2017. All parties held their respective conferences over the past few months, and during the Conservative’s conference, she outlined her plans for brexit to occur and negotiations will continue to proceed towards structuring the UK’s plans for leaving the EU.

She also states that MP’s will not have a vote on the Tory’s outlined plans for triggering Article 50, and it will go ahead under the Conservatives ideals. This however, only means the negotiations will not be affected by MP’s, but they may have the final say upon the ‘final’ deal in place before the UK triggers article 50. More to come on that.

Jeremy Corbyn has retained his spot as Labour leader after beating his fellow competitor Owen Smith, winning just over 60% of the vote (61.8%). He has also since re-shaped Labours shadow cabinet and he wants to be a pivotal part of the brexit negotiations, as well as challenging the tories in the 2020 general election.

Finally, the last ‘major story’ over the past few weeks delves into the American Presidential race between Republican candidate Donald Trump and Democrat candidate Hilary Clinton. They have held the first few hustings, gaining millions of viewers worldwide, which have provided some interesting outcomes.

It’s reported that neither of them are winning outright in each hustings, but many feel Hilary Clinton is just edging them slightly over her rival Trump. Trump hasn’t been short of controversy in his debating skills, bringing up sexism, racism and prejudism into the fray through is ‘normalised’ bigoted views. Hilary herself has also been scrutinised for her deleted emails, ill well-being and behind the scenes issues by Trump, so both candidates are under heavy fire whilst trying to become president. The polls still have them neck and neck come November 8th (the date of the election) so more to come on that in the next few weeks.

What do you make of these major political stories over the past few weeks?

Is UKIP going to recover soon? Who will be their new leader? Will brexit be a success? Has Theresa May shown enough ambition fro Britain? Will Jeremy Corbyn be a success as Labour leader? Can they compete with the tories in 2020? Who do you think will be the next American President and why?

Comment below your views on any of the respective stories below

Advertisements

Brexit will go ahead, Government Officials announce

SOURCE: BBC

Today, the government have announced that it will ‘push ahead’ and start to work towards triggering Brexit without Parliamentary approval, according to Downing Street officials.

The statement comes after Theresa May’s cabinet gathered at Chequers (the Prime Ministers Country Escape), and after discussions ended, it was announced at Number 10 that an agreement between collective cabinet ministers that their is a need for a ‘unique’ deal for the UK to occur.

Furthermore, Mrs May told cabinet colleagues that their needs to be a focus on the ‘positive opportunities’ that lie outside the EU, as she reiterated there would be no second referendum.

The BBC have outlined that Mrs May has said the UK would not stay in the EU “by the back door”.

The Prime Minister has also said official talks with the rest of the EU will not begin this year.

The respective meeting at the PM’s country residence is clearly the most significant since the referendum vote in June to exit the EU. Despite reports of tensions and diverging priorities among key figures in the Cabinet, the process to leave will go ahead and the Referendum result will be respected.

Its reported that the Cabinet ministers were asked before their summer break’s to identify what were described as the “opportunities” best suited for their respective departments.

These talks are influential upon Mrs May’s empowering words that the government was clear that “Brexit means Brexit”.

She further commented in her speech that: “We will be looking at the next steps that we need to take and we will also be looking at the opportunities that are now open to us as we forge a new role for the UK in the world”

Despite these talks, the prime minister has said the UK government will not trigger Article 50 – the official mechanism for beginning the process of leaving the EU – ‘until the start of 2017 at the earliest.’

Once triggered, discussions over the terms of the UK’s exit will reportedly conclude in two years, unless all 28 members of the EU agree to extend them.

Wednesday’s cabinet meeting is seen as a major opportunity for Mrs May and senior colleagues to talk through the issues involved ahead of this weekend’s summit of G20 leaders in China.

What do you make of the Governments Brexit plans?

Is now the time to get the ball rolling with Brexit? How do you think the UK will negotiate it’s deals with the EU? What will the UK get out of these deals?

Comment your views on brexit below