Pro-Brexit MP Gisela Stuart claims ‘EU citizens are currently being left in limbo’ by the Government

SOURCE: BBC

One of the leading Vote Leave figures Gisela Stuart has said EU citizens in the UK have been “left in limbo” since the referendum result to leave the European Union.

Furthermore, the Labour MP is expected to head a research project on how to protect EU migrant rights after the UK leaves the EU.

It will be a cross-party inquiry for the British Future think tank to examine what kind of legal status’ could be granted to EU citizens in the UK, in time before the process to leave the EU starts by the inevitable triggering of Article 50.

Many Ministers have indicated strongly that they want to protect EU citizens’ status – as long as a reciprocal deal can be negotiated.

It’s reported that multiple MPs from all parties have attacked the government’s stance, saying people “are not bargaining chips”.

Ms Stuart, the former co-chair of the Vote Leave campaign, has stated the government should quickly outline that all EU citizens in the UK – about three million people – will be allowed to stay after Brexit.

She further states that the government should “take the initiative” and emphasize their intentions to protect UK-EU citizens’ rights and that it expected the same treatment for UK nationals abroad.

She also believes Ministers should demonstrate that leaving the EU “doesn’t mean that we’re ignoring people’s rights”.

Meanwhile, the Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron believes it’s “pretty shameful” for Ms Stuart to be “claiming to be worried” about the rights of EU citizens.

He said she had been part of a campaign that “whipped up anti-immigrant feeling” and “contributed to an increase of hate crimes against Europeans”.

“It is like the arsonist turning round and saying they are surprised that a fire took hold,” Mr Farron has said.

Lastly, David Davis, the newly named Brexit secretary by new Prime Minister Theresa May, will oversee the negotiations on the UK’s exit from the European Union, and has said that he wants to secure a “generous settlement” for both EU nationals in the UK, and British citizens abroad.

Ministers have said it would be “unwise” to fully “guarantee” EU citizens’ rights without a deal for Britons abroad.

What do you make of the uncertainty behind EU citizens rights living in the UK?

Do the government need to state and maintain transparent and accountable help towards EU migrants living in the UK quickly? Will the government fully help EU migrants living in the UK?

Comment your views on EU migrant rights below

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A Second Scottish independence referendum ‘could be next year’ – Nicola Sturgeon

SOURCE: BBC

Nicola Sturgeon has announced on a BBC interview with Andrew Marr that she would consider a second referendum on Scottish independence as ‘early as next year’ if necessary.

The first minister told the BBC that could happen if the UK government started the formal process of leaving the EU without Scotland’s position being safeguarded.

She has also however, suggested that Scotland could stay in the UK and the EU, if UK talks with the EU have Scotland in the best interests of both sides.

The UK minister responsible for Brexit David Davis, said he did not think this would work.

But earlier, the prime minister Theresa May said she would listen to any options brought forward by the Scottish government.

Mrs May also said she would not trigger article 50 – the formal process of the UK leaving the EU – until there was a “UK approach and objectives”.

Further in Andrew Mars interview, Ms Sturgeon said “Do I think Theresa May will never ever trigger article 50 unless I am happy with direction the UK is taking? I don’t know that is the case. But she indicated she wants, as I want, to find options to respect how Scotland voted.”

When asked if she would be happy to have an independence referendum in the first half of next year, she said: “I will have an indyref 2, if I come to conclusion that is in the best interests of Scotland.

“I’ve always said that. It would be up to Scottish people ultimately to decide if that is right way to go.”

She added that if a referendum was going to be held it would make sense for that to happen before the UK left the EU.

Speaking on the show about Scotland’s position regarding the EU, the first minister said there was effectively a “blank sheet of paper”, creating an opportunity to explore previously “unthinkable” options.

Ms Sturgeon also said she thought Scotland was in a “very strong” position in the UK’s Brexit talks after Mrs May said she would not begin the formal process of leaving the EU without a UK-wide consensus.

Brexit Minister David Davis has spoken to Sky News, and is the UK government minister responsible for Brexit. He has said that he did not think Scotland could have such an arrangement when it comes to vetoing the democratic decision.

He added that no-one could have a veto over Brexit, saying the government would not ignore the referendum result.

“One of our really challenging issues to deal with will be the internal border we have with southern Ireland, and we’re not going to go about creating other internal borders inside the United Kingdom.”

What’s your view of a possible 2nd Scottish Independence Referendum next year?

Will Scotland have the powers to veto brexit? Will Scotland having a referendum be in the best interests of the whole UK? Will it be possible for Scotland to have a special status by still being in the EU, despite the vote to leave?

Comment below your views on Brexit, a 2nd Scottish Independent Referendum and Nicola Sturgeon 

Theresa May’s newly appointed Cabinet

SOURCE: BBC

Theresa May has finalised her cabinet as the new UK Prime Minister, by shuffling, firing and hiring across her whole Cabinet team, including the ‘big’ jobs of Chancellor of the Exchequer, Foreign Secretary and Home Secretary.

Those fired include George Osborne, Michael Gove, John Whittingdale, Nicky Morgan and Oliver Letwin.

With all of the key cabinet appointments now announced, we can see how Prime Minister Theresa May has balanced her cabinet for the brexit negotiations and for the next few years. Here’s the list of the cabinet:

International Trade Secretary – Liam Fox 

Chancellor of the Exchequer – Philip Hammond

Foreign Secretary – Boris Johnson

Home Secretary – Amber Rudd

Defence Secretary – Michael Fallon

Health Secretary – Jeremy Hunt

Secretary of State for Exiting the EU – David Davis

Justice Secretary – Liz Truss

Education Secretary – Justine Greening

Secretary of State for International Trade – Liam Fox

Transport Secretary – Chris Grayling

Chief Whip – Gavin Williamson

Conservative Party chairman – Patrick McLoughlin

Leader of the House of Lords – Baroness Evans

Leader of the House of Commons -David Lidington

Culture Secretary – Karan Brady

International Development -Priti Patel

Communities and Local Government – Sajid Javid

Work and Pensions – Dominic Green

Scottish Secretary – David Mundell

Welsh Secretary – Alan Cairns

Northern Ireland Secretary – James Brokenshire

2nd placed Andrea Leadsman in the tory party race has earned herself the spot as Environment secretary. 

Controversial Jeremy Hunt maintains his spot as the Health Secretary.

Boris Johnson is the new Foreign Secretary which is a surprise to many after his Vote Leave campaigning and claims by people saying he constantly ‘lied’.

Amber Rudd replaces the new Prime Minister Theresa May as Home Secretary.

David Davis has been announced as the first ever ‘Brexit Secretary’ that will help lead the negotiations for the UK exit from the European Union.

Dr Liam Fox also becomes the first ever ‘International Trade Secretary’, so it is clear that it has been a Brexit motivated cabinet shuffle by Theresa May. ‘Brexit is Brexit’ after all.

What do you make of the newly made changes to the Conservative cabinet of UK Governance?

Will these newly appointed Cabinet MP’s get the best ‘Brexit’ outcomes for the UK, in terms of mainly trade? Who else would you have rather seen enter the Cabinet and in what roles? Is the UK now set to negotiate an EU exit?

Comment below your views on the new conservative cabinet and brexit