Government ‘Guarantee’ post-EU funds after Brexit occurs

SOURCE: BBC

It has been announced today that EU funding, which the UK receives as a member that will consequently be lost after Brexit occurs, given to organisations involving farming, scientists and others, will be replaced by the Treasury, Chancellor Philip Hammond has said.

Brexit could cost up to £6bn a year in losses of funding, but the Treasury will guarantee to back EU-funded projects signed before this year’s Autumn Statement.

The BBC have stated that agricultural funding which is now provided by the EU will also continue until 2020.

However, critics said the guarantee does not go far enough and there was ‘continued uncertainty’.

Voters ultimately backed to leave the EU in the 23 June referendum by 3.8%, but Prime Minister Theresa May has indicated the UK government will not trigger Article 50, which would begin a two-year process to leave, during 2016.

Furthermore, Mr Hammond has said “EU structural and investment fund projects signed before the Autumn Statement later this year, and Horizon research funding granted before leaving the EU, will be guaranteed by the Treasury after the UK leaves.”

The BBC have also said ‘the EU’s 80bn euro (£69bn) Horizon 2020 programme awards funding for research and innovation and is open to UK institutions while the country remains a member.’

The chancellor responded to critics by saying the government was “determined to ensure that people have stability and certainty in the period leading up to our departure from the EU”.

The Treasury said it would assess whether to guarantee funding for certain other projects “that might be signed after the Autumn Statement, but while we remain a member of the EU”.

Currently, farmers receive subsidies and other payments under the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy (CAP).

It’s said that they get about £3bn a year in subsidies, with the biggest farmers pocketing cheques of £1m. The grants are given for owning land and also taking care of wildlife.

The National Farmers’ Union (NFU) said the Treasury’s announcement was “positive” for farming.

Other examples of projects that have received, or are due to receive regional development fund money, include:

  • £5m for the Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre at the University of Manchester
  • £9m for the manufacturing growth programme to support areas in the Midlands, Yorkshire and the Humber and the East of England
  • £3m for a new life sciences incubation and innovation centre at Porton Down in Wiltshire

(BBC 2016)

Reportedly, the UK currently pays money into the EU budget, which will stop once it formally leaves.

In 2015 the UK Government paid in £13bn; EU spending on the UK was £4.5bn, meaning the UK’s net contribution was estimated at about £8.5bn, or £161m a week.

The UK private sector receives a further £1-1.5bn annually in EU funding.

What do you make of the Governments post-EU promisees?

Is the affordable for the UK to do? Will this mean Taxation and further Austerity cuts? Are these promises realistic?

Comment below your views on the post-EU funding plans

The UK interest rates are cut to 0.25%

SOURCE: BBC

It was announced recently that the UK interest rates have now been cut from 0.5% to 0.25% by the Bank of England, which is a record low and the first cut since 2009.

Furthermore, the Bank of England has also signalled that rates could go lower if the economy worsens.

The BBC have stated that the Bank of England has also announced that ‘additional measures to stimulate the UK economy, including a £100bn scheme to force banks to pass on the low interest rate to households and businesses.’

It’s said that it will also buy £60bn of UK government bonds and £10bn of corporate bonds.

Governor Mark Carney said there was scope to cut the interest rate further.

He said that a majority of the nine-member Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) backed another cut if subsequent data showed the economy was deteriorating.

The governor additionally stated that banks have ‘no excuse’ not to pass on the lower borrowing costs to customers and will be charged a penalty if they fail to do so.

“The MPC is determined that the stimulus the economy needs does not get diluted as it passes through the financial system” – Governor Carney.

The Bank also announced the biggest cut to its growth forecasts since it started making them in 1993.

It has reduced its growth prediction for 2017 from the 2.3% it was expecting in May to 0.8%.

Mr Carney that the decision to leave the EU marked a ‘regime change’ in which the UK would “redefine its openness to the movements of goods, services, people and capital”.

How will the Interests rates effect you?

Here is a link  by the BBC that runs over a few things.

Here is a breakdown to what they think.

Mortgages

They claim that a mortgage is by “far the biggest debt taken on by the majority of households in the UK.”

It’s said that an estimated ‘11.1 million households have one.’ The typical amount still left to pay on each home loan in the UK is £116,000, according to the Council for Mortgage Lenders.

Some Banks have quickly announced that they would “pass the cut on in full from September, with others expected to follow suit.” The BBC have also said that a “separate scheme announced by the Bank – called the Term Funding Scheme – is designed to ensure that banks pass on the rate cut.”

There are those on fixed rate mortgages – equating to nearly half (46%) of all mortgage holders.

They will see no change. However, if their mortgage term is up soon, they may find they pay less if and when they sign up to a new one. Fixed mortgage rates on new deals have been falling – even when there was no change to the Bank rate.

An increasing number of people have signed up to longer term fixed rate deals – locking them in for up to 10 years. For them, this change is fairly irrelevant.

Savings

The BBC supposedly say that the theory of a Bank rate cut is that “consumers see a cut in their mortgage bill, and a worsening return on their savings, so they go out and spend.” Hence, there is a boost to the economy and the same goes for businesses who will be more minded to invest.

That is the relatively simplistic explanation but it does make it clear that a Bank rate cut is bad for savers.

So overall as an example, “for anyone with £10,000 saved in such an account, they will receive £40 a year in gross interest, which is £25 less than before the cut.”

Pensions

The Bank of England also added further stimulus measures to the rate cut – namely, the purchase of government and corporate bonds. So as the BBC state, this will have no effect on the state pension.

It will, however, add extra pressure on the deficits facing defined benefit pension schemes, such as final-salary pensions, putting increased pressure on businesses to plug that gap or reduce the availability of such pensions.

Holiday money

The decision by the Bank of England has led to a fall in the value of the pound, meaning exchange rates will be more expensive.

What do you make of the BBC’s articles and the interest rate cuts?

Is this all due to the aftermath of Brexit? Will cutting interest rates help stabilise the economy? Do you think that interest rates will fall further?

Comment below your views on the interest rates cut and the BBC’s articles below

G20 announce that Global Economic Risks have ‘heightened’ due to Brexit

SOURCE: BBC

After the UK’s vote to leave the European Union, risks to the world economy have heightened, according to the global finance chiefs at the end of the G20 summit in China.

The outcome of last month’s EU referendum ‘adds to the uncertainty’ for the global economy, the group of the world’s 20 largest economies further said.

“In the future, we hope to see the UK as a close partner of the EU,” the G20 collectively said.

The UK Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond revealed the subject had come up ‘a great deal’ at the two-day talks.

“The reality is there will be a measure of uncertainty continuing right up to the conclusion of our negotiations with the EU,” Philip Hammond told reporters.

Following the meeting in the Chinese city of Chengdu, the G20 group said it was well placed to actively cope with the potential economic and financial impact from the Brexit vote.

However, despite the threats the G20 agreed that despite the Brexit vote, the global economy ‘would improve in 2016 and 2017’, Mr Weidmann (the president of Germany’s central bank) said.

Separately, G20 policymakers said they recognised that excess steel supply was a global issue.

The excess capacity of steel has had a negative impact on trade and workers and requires a collective response, they said.

It was also announced that Britain’s decision to leave the EU has led to a ‘dramatic deterioration’ in economic activity, not seen since the aftermath of the financial crisis.

Data from IHS Markit’s Purchasing Managers’ Index, or PMI, shows a fall to 47.7 in July, the lowest level since April in 2009. A reading below 50 indicates contraction.

What do you make of these announcements by the G20? 

Has the Brexit warnings by the Stronger In campaigners become a fact? Will the economy suffer heavily from a brexit? If so, will it be able to grow again by 2017?

Comment below your views on Brexit’s outcomes and a potential global economy suffering the G20 have announced as a result of brexit

The Trident Weapons System has been renewed after MP’s vote 472-117 for it’s renewal

SOURCE: BBC

Tonight, MPs have heavily backed the renewal of the UK’s Trident nuclear weapons system, voting 472 to 117 in favour for it in Parliament.

The vote has now approved the manufacture of four replacement submarines at an estimated cost of £31bn.

The Defence Secretary Michael Fallon spoke to MPs in the house, saying nuclear threats were growing around the world and Trident ‘puts doubts in the minds of our adversaries’.

The Labour party was split over the issue with many of its MPs defying leader Jeremy Corbyn and backing the government.

Although Labour MPs were given a free vote, many used the occasion to attack Mr Corbyn, who is a longstanding opponent of nuclear weapons. The BBC has quoted that ‘60% of Labour’s MPs voted in favour of Trident renewal.’

Furthermore, the BBC have said that the SNP ‘opposed the move’, saying nuclear weapons were ‘immoral’ and the continued stationing of submarines on the Clyde could accelerate moves towards independence.

The vote saw a majority of 355 for trident renewal and was announced at the end of a five-hour debate, in which Prime Minister Theresa May spoke at the despatch box for the first time as prime minister.

Mrs May said it would be an ‘act of gross irresponsibility’ for the UK to abandon the continuous-at-sea weapons system.

Although preparatory work on renewal is already under way, Monday’s vote will give the final green light to a new fleet of submarines which are due to come into service by the early 2030s.

Mr Fallon has also spoken to say Trident had ‘helped protect the UK for more than 50 years’ and to disown it now would be to ‘gamble the long-term security of our citizens’.

The UK has faced growing threats from rogue nations, such as North Korea, as well as a more assertive Russia, he said.

“Nuclear weapons are here, they are not going to disappear,” Mr Fallon furthered. “It is the role of government to make sure we can defend ourselves against them.”

What’s your view of the Trident renewal?

Was it the best choice for the future of the UK’s defence matters? Is it to expensive to fund? Will it serve to be a ‘good’ decision for the UK overtime? What do you make of the overwhelming majority for it’s renewal?

Comment below your views on the trident renewals 

My View of Brexit

Usually, I remain impartial when writing this blog, however after the obvious Brexit vote that has occurred I wish to voice my personal views of the outcome.

Personally, I am cautiously disappointed with the UK vote to leave the EU.

Hands up, I am still learning about political theory, facts and idea’s, so my personal thoughts may not be perfect, but I do have a large interest and passion for politics so I feel my views are valid. I also study it in parts at university, I write this political blog and I am also working in politics for my year-long placement as evidence for this.

Onto my in-depth view. After so many pre-warnings by top experts across many departments from the economists like the IMF, to the security folks like MI5, I am surprised at a brexit after some of the statements Vote Leave have come out with overtime. In terms of their biggest arguments for leave, I believed the 350million a week given to the EU that was written on the big red buses of vote leave was false, it was far less considering what we gain back from the EU and the rebates in place. I believed that Turkey were never close to joining the EU that Vote Leave stated in it’s leaflets, where around 79million people would have had access to come to the UK to live and work. I also believed that their arguments on ‘saving’ the NHS and sustaining the Economy were no where near as strong as Stronger In’s arguments.

Nevertheless, I am a big believer in the economy, pragmatism and state-collectivism and I believed working in a reformed European Union with the other 27 EU states was best for Britain overall. I believed the Economy would have thrived further in the EU, due to the free-trade act and deals we have within the 500 million+ (people strong) EU economy on offer. Speaking as a conservative, cosmopolitan and humanist, I believed the fact that people could have a more democratic chance of working and living across Europe and embrace the ever growing notion of globalisation was fundamentally positive for the UK to be a part of. I believed simply that the UK was better, stronger and safer in the EU. Now, I hope overtime these concepts can be used to keep the UK on track, stay strong economically and remain secure as a nation.

The EU is far from perfect, thats fact. Much needs to be changed overtime. However, I believed we should have stayed in the EU to voice our views at the table and help to change the EU system and bureaucracy for the better of all EU states. Uncertainty is now at large for the UK. Cameron will resign in October, the SNP want Scottish Independence, the pound has been hit hard and political carers such as Jeremy Corbyn and George Osborne are in turmoil just a day after leaving the EU. As a young 20 year-old male, I am nervous and cautious as to what the future holds, as it could be my generation that picks up any negative implications from a brexit overtime.

For those who wanted a Brexit, I now hope you can achieve all you voted for. For example, gaining back our ‘lost’ sovereignty, getting the job that migrants were taking from UK citizens and governing by our own rules and accepting the uncertainty that lies ahead. I also hope that you voted for the benefits that Brexit might give yourself and I hope you did not vote as a protest against the current government, or because you weren’t entirely sure what to do.

For those that wanted to stay, I hope that the UK can heal the potential wounds that have opened and we embrace the democratic decision that has occurred. I feel the UK will get back on track eventually as it’s within our nature to overcome uncertainty and turmoil. For instance, we have overcome major recessions, world wars and major domestic issues over the last century or so. This can be dealt with eventually.

I now hope the nation comes together and unites in the decision chosen. I hope the UK can now move on to negotiate good trade deals. I hope the UK can create fair migrant deals and those few MPs who wanted a brexit will especially do the UK justice. I hope the Pound will level out to after the large potential losses it faces. I also hope that Scotland will remain within the UK to keep it united and stronger, as well as Northern Ireland and Wales. Uncertainty is at large, but time is a great healer and hopefully the UK will eventually level out and be strong as an independent state with it’s own voice, laws and sovereignty under the right ideologies, government and UK voice.

Top bosses move to back Remain ahead of EU vote

Source: BBC

In an article by the BBC, it’s reported that top bosses including Sir Richard Branson, the Premier League chair and car industry executives have backed Remain ahead of Thursday’s EU vote.

Football:

Premier League chair Richard Scudamore said the 20 clubs in the top tier wanted to remain and that leaving would be “incongruous” in the context of the league’s commitment to “openness”.

Mr Scudamore further stated in a BBC Radio 5 live interview that leaving would be “incongruous” in the context of the league’s commitment to “openness”.

“There is an openness about the Premier League which I think it would be completely incongruous if we were to take the opposite position,” he said.

Entrepreneurs: 

Meanwhile, Sir Richard Branson has warned a British exit from the EU would be “devastating” for the UK’s long-term prosperity.

Sir Branson, who has long backed the Remain campaign, wrote an open letter, recalling “how difficult it was” for businesses to operate effectively before the EU, adding he was “saddened” at the prospect of returning to those days.

Car Industries:

Car industry trade bodies and the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders’ (SMMT), warned leaving the EU would increase costs and threaten jobs.

“Remaining will allow the UK to retain the influence on which the unique and successful UK automotive sector depends,” said chief executive Mike Hawes.

Directors at Toyota UK, Vauxhall, Jaguar Land Rover and BMW, as well as from component makers GKN and Magal Engineering, also voiced their support.

Soft Drinks Companies:

Drinks giant Diageo’s chief executive Ivan Menezes wrote to the company’s 4,773 UK employees, telling them that it would be “better for the UK, better for Diageo and better for the Scotch whisky industry that we remain in”.

Mr Menezes said Diageo benefited from ease of access to the European single market, as well as trade deals that the EU had negotiated with the rest of the world.

Backlash?

John Longworth, chair of Vote Leave business council, said the UK would be better off outside the EU.

“The single market isn’t a nirvana, it’s a mirage. The single market’s a protectionist area.

What do you make of this recent report?

Will this effect the voting polls knowing major Companies/individuals are remain minded? Can Vote Leave tackle the issues that these global companies/individuals are saying? How will the referendum turn out on the 23rd, a remain or leave result?

Comment Below YOUR views on Stronger In’s backing companies/individuals views. 

 

IMF says EU exit ‘largest near-term risk’ to British economy

Source: BBC

In a recent BBC business article, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has warned that a ”UK exit from the European Union (EU) could mean the UK misses out on up to 5.6% of GDP growth by 2019”

They (IMF) further state that a Brexit is the “largest near-term risk” to the UK economy, during the IMF’s annual UK economic outlook.

It added during the gathering that the “net economic effects would probably be ‘negative’ and ‘substantial.”

However, the Economists for the Brexit campaign state the “consensus that a UK exit would be bad for the economy was ‘based on flawed EU-centric models’.”

The IMF advisedly say that under its least adverse scenario for Brexit, by 2019 UK GDP would be 1.4% below what it would be should the UK vote to stay in the EU.

Its most adverse Brexit scenario predicts 2019 growth 5.6% below what it would otherwise have been, and also a drop in GDP in 2017 of 0.8%, which an IMF official described as a “recession”.

Under this scenario the UK would return to GDP growth of 2.9% in 2021. But the UK would have missed out on 4.5% of growth by then, according to the IMF.

‘Substantial Brexit costs’

Following a Brexit, the IMF finally said the UK would have to negotiate new trade terms with the EU if it wanted to stay in the single market.

If not, the UK could rely on World Trade Organisation rules, but this would ‘significantly raise trade barriers’, believe the IMF.

What do you make of the IMF brexit warning? Will the UK suffer economic consequences if it were to leave the EU? Will Brexit be able to negotiate trade deals quickly? 

Comment below YOUR views of the IMF’s Brexit warning 

ThePoliticsView on The EU Referendum: Overview, facts and a helpful insight

This is a personal blog into the EU Referendum by ThePoliticsView on the EU Referendum. This shall remain impartial, but strong views my be expressed in the process.

  1. What do we know about the EU? What does it do?

This should help explain each part of the EU and how Laws are made throughout it… It is run by the European Council which is effectively the head Government of each state inside the European Union. There are 28 states in the EU, so there are 28 head of states representing it. The UK’s head of Council is currently the Prime Minister David Cameron, who helps to negotiate the general direction in how EU laws are scrutinised and legislated.

The next part of the EU construct is the European Commission headed by Jean-Claude Juncker, who are nominated members selected by each head of state and the UK’s is currently Lord Hill, who was respectfully nominated by the PM David Cameron to represent the UK in the Commission. There are 28 Commissioners as each head of the 28 states elects one each. EU Commissioners effectively help to propose and come up with laws that follows the directions of the Councils ideas. Furthermore, these laws made by the Commissioners are passed down to the European Parliament. 

This part of the EU are elected members by each of the states citizens in European Elections held every four to five years by EU states. There are a total of 751 MEP’s elected across all nations in the EU, where 73 come from the UK.  MEP’s from the UK are elected regionally, which include conservative Ashley Fox from the South west, UKIP leader Nigel Farage from the South East to the SNP member Ian Hudghton up in Scotland. These members of the EU help to scrutinise and amend policies and laws given by the Commissioners which is what makes the EU more democratic.

These Laws are then passed down finally onto the Councils of the European Union, who are different sub-groups of the EU who help to put final amendments onto proposed laws from the powers above. For example, if a law was associated with Climate Change, the officials of each EU state associated with environmental matters would help to put their expertise on hand to finalise the the laws being made. Once each four of these EU categories can conclude and vote in favour of the laws proposed, they are made Law by Brussels power-heads and legislated into laws all states abide too.

Along the way, the EU court of Justice will make sure that law making is made fairly and suited to the cause. The European Central Bank helps to look after the economies of each state that acquire the Euro to make sure everyone is working well financially. The UK is excluded as they have the Pound and run their own system through home banking. Finally, the EU Court of Auditors makes sure that the EU states spend their money correctly to stop economic crises occurring such as a recession.

That was a LOT to take in right?! Although that was a rhetorical question, feel free to comment your views about ThePoliticsView of how the EU is run below.

2. Now onto people voting.

Obviously, on the 23rd June the UK has an EU Referendum to decide wether we stay or remain in the EU. Vote Leave want to ‘Leave’ the EU such as former London Mayor Boris Johnson and the Justice Security Michael Gove, and then the Stronger In campaigners want to remain in the EU, which include the PM David Cameron and The Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne. (click links for insights of each campaigns arguments)

Whether you agree or disagree with the campaigns, you need to make a decision yourself on whether to remain or leave, if you are eligible to do so. If you have registered, but are undecided or may not vote, you have time to do your research and let yourself decide what’s best for you. Don’t be scaremongered by the politics and look closer to home. If your life has been effected heavily by a migrant/immigrant, such as you’ve lost out on work, or a home because of one, maybe look to see what ‘Vote Leave’ says. If you already have a job and a good income, you may want to see what the ‘Stronger In’ side say, to see how the Economics behind leaving may effect you. It could mean you are worse off because of a potential rise in tax as the UK may leave the EU’s free trade market, but we’ll come onto the Negatives and Positives later.

If you are a sovereign person, you can argue ‘getting our country back’ as Nigel Farage states most of the time can reinstate sovereignty to the UK. However, ThePoliticsView argues that UK sovereignty will always exist either way for generations to come. Tea sipping, the Monarchy, Great British Bulldogs can and always will exist in a world that will hopefully not see another World War occur or the British Dying due to a freak disease only effecting UK citizens! In terms of voting, do what you feel is best and argue to yourself, ‘is life really that bad at the moment’? If the answer is no, then staying in the EU will not change your life as dramatically as leaving, and life will carry on as normal for years to come. If the answer is Yes, then perhaps a UK ‘Brexit’ can benefit you, but that all depends on things such as your economic state, your sovereign attitude and your willingness to accept potential economic failures/hardship and allowing people to come and live/work in the UK under certain rules.

       3. The Main Positives and Negatives of the EU. 

Enough of voting matters now, and onto the ‘Pros and Cons’ of the EU. The major positive supported by Britain Stronger in Europe Campaigners is the free trade market the UK accesses from it’s EU membership. This means trade around each of the 28 states is tariff/tax free, keeping prices low, VAT low and trading to become easier. It also allows people to come and offer their skills to improve the UK economy, filling both skilled jobs (like doctors, dentists ect) and laboured jobs (like builders, cleaners etc). However, this is also seen as a negative due to the free movement of people act as a rule of receiving free trade. This means any EU states citizen can live and work in another EU state almost without any restriction which causes over population and competition, especially in a place like the UK with all it’s benefits and growing economy. This is Vote Leaves main focus, because if we leave, they suggest the UK can control it’s boarders and limit the amount of people coming into the UK. On the other hand, David Cameron believes that if we stay, he has negotiated a ‘special status’ deal to make sure migrants have to get a job within a certain time period, speak english to working proficiency, not claim benefits right away and creditably offer something to the UK in four years or be ‘kicked out’.

One other thing to bare in mind is the Schengen Agreement. This means 26 of the 28 states (doesn’t include the UK or Ireland) ”allows for passport free travel through the 26 European states as participating countries have agreed not to impose border controls.” This makes it slightly harder for people to come into the UK and Ireland as they have to go through boarder checks to be allowed into the country. It’s a small act to consider as it allows the UK and Ireland to control it’s boarders better, potentially helping to stop fugitives and wanted terrorists to come freely into the UK or Ireland.

However, the main thing to take out of this, is the positive of free trade and the ‘sort of’ negative to the free movement of people. The free movement of people has been mostly made out to be negative thing because immigration/migration is the main focus of Vote Leave unlike Stronger In, who focus more on the Economic issues surrounding Brexit. 

        4. UK parties, where do they stand?

In terms of individual parties, The Conservatives are at a ’50/50′ of In and Outs due to split views of what’s best of the UK. (See links above for remain and leave arguments). The main In parties are firstly, Labour mainly because of the Workers Rights the EU offers. The Liberal Democrats because of various liberal ideas and ‘fairness’ EU laws give many people across the EU, such as the chance to live and work anywhere in the EU. The Greens because they feel the environment is a global matter to tackle and should be done with the alliances of other EU states. The SNP are the final major party to want remain due to the fact Scotland parliament wishes to remain in the EU.

Although these parties all want to remain, individual/groups of MP’s want to leave from each party also, who will work alongside essentially the entire UKIP party striving to fulfil their whole purpose. ‘Get our Country Back’. Other smaller parties like the BNP and Britain First are campaigning to leave based on similar, perhaps more facist views to the UKIP ideals.

      5. Has this helped? 

ThePoliticsView offers news and the chance for you to comment on political stories everyday, and we want to know if this helps you at all to decide where you stand on voting in the EU. We have tried to remain impartial as we can, by just stating facts and ideas from the campaigns and how it might effect you mostly when you go to cast your vote.

Please offer you insights on this blog in the comment section below and if you made it this far, thank you for reading this one off insight by ThePoliticsView! 

Stronger In: Voice YOUR views on Britain Stronger in Europe’s Campaign

Official Website: http://www.strongerin.co.uk/

This specific blog aims to allow you to simply voice your views about the Europhile Campaigners Britain Stronger in Europe. Stronger In are headed by individuals such as the UK Prime Minister David Cameron (Conservatives), Chancellor of the exchequer George Osborne (Conservatives) and Leader of the Labour Party Jeremy Corbyn. 

Britain Stronger in Europe mainly argue the following key points as to why the UK should remain in the European Union.

  • The EU allows for better security and citizen protection via its policies and working together with the other 27 EU states. It relates to boosting the UK defence industry. 
  • The UK expenditure given to the EU allows the UK to access the EU’s Free Trade Market. This allows for a no tariff or taxation process to occur when importing, exchanging and transporting products to other EU states, which ultimately keeps prices low and reduces VAT. 
  • Migration and Immigration allow the UK Economy to grow due to skilled workers and laboured jobs being filled and worked at efficiently.
  • They argue over 200,000 UK businesses trade with the EU, so leaving would potentially effect the way these businesses are run and could see many close or go bankrupt.
  • The last key point they have is the high number of economists who give warnings of a Brexit, due to the potential negative economic consequences of this occurring which includes the IMF. 

These are the main points from the Stronger In campaign as to why the UK should remain in the EU, which is mainly focussed upon the negative Economic consequences that  could occur if Britain were to leave the EU.

So what’s your view of the Stronger In campaigning and are their arguments valid and solid enough to sway you to vote for them?

Comment Below YOUR views on Britain Stronger in Europe’s campaigning and Remain arguments.

Brexit: Voice YOUR views on Vote Leave’s Campaign

Official Website: http://www.voteleavetakecontrol.org/

This specific blog aims to allow you to simply voice your views about the Eurosceptic Campaigners Vote Leave. Vote Leave are headed by individuals such as the Justice Minister Michael Gove (Conservatives), former London Mayor Boris Johnson MP (Conservatives) and a helping hand from UKIP leader and head of the defunct Grassroots Out Campaign Nigel Farage MEP. 

Vote Leave mainly argue the following key points as to why the UK should Leave the European Union.

  • Britain Pays £350 million every week to the EU which amounts to the cost of facilitating and building a new hospital.
  • They argue that Five new nations want to join the EU with a total up too 89 million potential new migrants and immigrants allowed to come to work and live in the UK. The nations are as follows: (Population in Brackets)
  1. Albania (2.8 million)
  2. Montenegro (600,000)
  3. Macedonia (2.1 million)
  4. Turkey (76 million)
  5. Serbia (7.2 million)
  • The EU overrules UK Laws: Vote Leave suggests that UK laws are ‘dictated’ by the EU that stops the British public being able to vote out the politicians who make european laws.
  • Vote Leave claim that the UK can still trade within the EU and tap into the european market just like Norway.
  • UK Sovereignty is lowered because Vote Leave argues the UK has lost its power and law making abilities to govern its own state.

These respective points outline the key arguments from the Vote Leave campaign, focusing on mainly the negatives of Immigration and decreased Sovereignty showing why the UK is better off outside the EU.

So what’s your view of the Brexit campaigning and are their arguments valid and solid enough to sway you to vote for them?

Comment Below YOUR views on Vote Leave and Brexit arguments.