Labour Leadership Candidate Owen Smith states he would ‘consider rejoining the EU’ if Prime Minister

SOURCE: BBC

Owen Smith, one of two Labour leadership hopefuls, the other being the current leader Jeremy Corbyn,  has told Andrew Marr – host of the Andrew Marr show, that he would “consider applying to rejoin the EU if he became prime minister”, when the UK had already left.

It was stated by Mr Smith with reasoning that he “could support the move if the UK was in recession or the NHS was on its knees”.

It is publicly known that he has previously called for the public to ‘have a say’ on the terms of the UK’s Brexit deal.

Furthermore, Mr Smith has also promised to fight towards a general election happening, making a “really strong case for us to stay” in the EU.

However, if the current Prime Minister Theresa May formally triggers Brexit using Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty next year, it means the UK will have inevitably left the bloc before the next scheduled general election in 2020.

Also speaking on the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show, Mr Smith – who is openly emphasising himself as ‘more pro-EU’ than current Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn – said it “was hard to answer a ‘hypothetical question’ about what he would do if he took over with the UK already outside the EU.”

However, he said if the “price of staying out” would cause something as catastrophic as a recession or damage to the NHS – “then I think the sensible and responsible thing for a Labour government to do is to say we are better off in the European Union”.

Despite the 23rd June referendum result to leave the EU, Mr Smith predicted “we will be telling a very different story to the British people” sometime in the future, if people’s well-beings and lives are suffering as a result of brexit.

He finally reiterated his open calls for a second referendum or a snap general election – to formally take place before the UK leaves the EU – on the terms agreed for Brexit.

What do you make of Owen Smiths comments on the possibility of him processing a UK re-entrance into the EU, if elected as PM?

Will this be undemocratic on his behalf to do considering the EU referendum result to leave winning by 3.8%? Will he ever be the PM? Will he beat Jeremy Corbyn to become Labours new leader?

Comment your views on Owen Smith’s ideas and chances of being PM or Labour leader below

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Brexit will go ahead, Government Officials announce

SOURCE: BBC

Today, the government have announced that it will ‘push ahead’ and start to work towards triggering Brexit without Parliamentary approval, according to Downing Street officials.

The statement comes after Theresa May’s cabinet gathered at Chequers (the Prime Ministers Country Escape), and after discussions ended, it was announced at Number 10 that an agreement between collective cabinet ministers that their is a need for a ‘unique’ deal for the UK to occur.

Furthermore, Mrs May told cabinet colleagues that their needs to be a focus on the ‘positive opportunities’ that lie outside the EU, as she reiterated there would be no second referendum.

The BBC have outlined that Mrs May has said the UK would not stay in the EU “by the back door”.

The Prime Minister has also said official talks with the rest of the EU will not begin this year.

The respective meeting at the PM’s country residence is clearly the most significant since the referendum vote in June to exit the EU. Despite reports of tensions and diverging priorities among key figures in the Cabinet, the process to leave will go ahead and the Referendum result will be respected.

Its reported that the Cabinet ministers were asked before their summer break’s to identify what were described as the “opportunities” best suited for their respective departments.

These talks are influential upon Mrs May’s empowering words that the government was clear that “Brexit means Brexit”.

She further commented in her speech that: “We will be looking at the next steps that we need to take and we will also be looking at the opportunities that are now open to us as we forge a new role for the UK in the world”

Despite these talks, the prime minister has said the UK government will not trigger Article 50 – the official mechanism for beginning the process of leaving the EU – ‘until the start of 2017 at the earliest.’

Once triggered, discussions over the terms of the UK’s exit will reportedly conclude in two years, unless all 28 members of the EU agree to extend them.

Wednesday’s cabinet meeting is seen as a major opportunity for Mrs May and senior colleagues to talk through the issues involved ahead of this weekend’s summit of G20 leaders in China.

What do you make of the Governments Brexit plans?

Is now the time to get the ball rolling with Brexit? How do you think the UK will negotiate it’s deals with the EU? What will the UK get out of these deals?

Comment your views on brexit below

Parliament to debate the 2nd EU Referendum Petition

SOURCE: BBC

After an online petition calling for a 2nd EU referendum which was signed over 4.1 million times, way over the 100,000 debating limit, Parliament have announced that a debate will be held come September 5th.

The petition was originally rejected by the website, saying ‘we must respect the result and prepare for brexit’ Here is a quote from the petitions website:

”As the Prime Minister made clear in his statement to the House of Commons on 27 June, the referendum was one of the biggest democratic exercises in British history with over 33 million people having their say. The Prime Minister and Government have been clear that this was a once in a generation vote and, as the Prime Minister has said, the decision must be respected. We must now prepare for the process to exit the EU and the Government is committed to ensuring the best possible outcome for the British people in the negotiations.”

They have since stated:

”The Petitions Committee has decided to schedule a House of Commons debate on this petition. The debate will take place on 5 September at 4.30pm in Westminster Hall, the second debating chamber of the House of Commons. The debate will be opened by Ian Blackford MP.”

The UK voted to leave the EU by 52% to 48% in the referendum on 23 June.

The petition, set up on 25 May before the referendum, states: “We the undersigned call upon HM Government to implement a rule that if the Remain or Leave vote is less than 60%, based on a turnout of less than 75%, there should be another referendum.”

What’s your view of this referendum petition?

Should there be a 2nd EU Referendum? Should brexit be respected and allowed to process? Will the debate be worthwhile and what will the result of it be?

Comment below your views of the 2nd EU Referendum debate scheduled for September

Does there have to be a second Referendum?

SOURCE: BBC

The claim is that a referendum lock that was introduced by the coalition government in 2011, means that there will have to be a second referendum before the UK leaves the EU.

However, a BBC article states a reality check into this claim, saying it’s ”far from clear that there’s any legal requirement for a second referendum and, even if there were, the referendum lock could be repealed.”

The BBC state’s:

”The European Union Act 2011, passed by the coalition government, created a so-called “referendum lock”. Its purpose was to create a legal requirement to hold a referendum if any proposal were made to transfer further powers from the UK to the EU.”

”However, because of the way the Act is worded, some people have argued that it could be used to force a second referendum before the UK leaves the EU. It says that any new treaty that amends or replaces one of the existing primary EU treaties should be subject to a referendum before it can be ratified.”

So if it was subsequently the case that the 2011 act had created a requirement for a second referendum, it could be avoided anyway despite this, by simply repealing the act. It would mean having to see both Houses of Parliament agreeing to overturn the existing law. But it wouldn’t necessarily be particularly difficult.

Ultimately, as long as the government and Parliament are still agreeing that the referendum result should be enacted and accepted on behalf of the democratic vote, it’s hard to see any sort of legal obstacle occur that would be insuperable to the referendum result. Ultimately, Parliament makes the laws and has emphasised that its mostly in favour of what the outcome was, a vote to leave the European Union by 3.8%.

What do you make of calls for a 2nd Referendum?

Will it be legally simple to try to get another referendum going? Because its reported that people are regretting their decision to leave, can this sway parliament to think twice about accepting the democratic vote? Will the UK be better off outside the EU eventually?

Comment below YOUR views on the EU Referendum outcome and calls for a 2nd referendum 

Brexit: What happens now the UK has voted for Independence from the EU?

Source: BBC

As is now known, the UK has voted to leave the EU – and has formulated a process that has come to be known as Brexit. Here is what is likely to happen next over the next few years.

  • A New Prime Minister is Needed Imminently:

As announced in a statement outside Downing Street, David Cameron has said the government would respect the result and carry out the instructions of the British people, reassuring the 2.9 million EU citizens in the UK that they will not be adversely affected.

Although his responsibility was to remain in No 10 to “steady the ship”, he announced he would step down in the autumn as he was not the right “captain to steer the country to its next destination”.

A new Conservative leader and prime minister is expected to be elected by 9 September.

Its widely reported that the Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has come under huge pressure from within his own party to consider his position, however he has insisted he will not step down.

Labour MPs have passed a motion of no confidence in Mr Corbyn, mainly due to there opinion of his weak leadership during the referendum campaign. As stated in the linked article above by ThePoliticsView, he is trying to fill gaps in his shadow cabinet following a wave of resignations.

Please note, this is not a formal mechanism for removing Mr Corbyn and he could survive even if the vote, should it take place, went against him.

  • Steady the Markets:

Market reaction to the referendum result was immediate and dramatic.

The BBC have announced that the FTSE 100 index of leading shares fell 8% after opening in London on Friday. Furthermore, there was a big sell-off of bank shares and house builders, with Barclays and RBS at one point down by more than 30%. By the end of trading, the index had bounced back, closing 2.8% down. The FTSE 250 index closed down 7% on Friday.

The value of the pound has also been hit hard on the foreign exchange markets, tumbling to lows not seen since 1985. At one stage, it hit $1.3305, a fall of more than 10%, although it too slightly recovered to close down 9% at $1.36.

The BBC have also written that the Chancellor George Osborne ”made a statement before the UK stock market opened on Monday in a bid to calm the markets. He said the UK was ready to face the future “from a position of strength” and indicated there would be no immediate emergency Budget.”

  • See how the EU leaders respond:

All EU leaders wanted the UK to stay in the bloc and a Leave vote has been met with disappointment and dismay across the Channel.

The BBC have said that ”hastily-convened meetings are taking place in Brussels and across foreign capitals on how to deal with the fallout of the UK’s decision, with the leaders of Germany, France and Italy meeting on Monday ahead of a wider EU summit later this week.”

European Council President Donald Tusk has appealed for unity among the EU’s 27 other members, saying the vote is historic but “not a moment for hysterical reactions”. German leader Angela Merkel said the vote was “regrettable” and a “watershed moment” for the EU.

  • Trigger Article 50:

There is a formal legal process for withdrawing from the EU – enshrined in Article 50 of the 2009 Lisbon Treaty – although it has never been invoked before.

Mr Cameron has said it should be up to his successor to decide when to activate Article 50 by notifying the European Council. Once this happens, the UK is cut out of EU decision-making at the highest level and there will be no way back unless by unanimous consent from all other member states.

Parliament and the BBC have said that ”quitting the EU is not an automatic process – it has to be negotiated with the remaining 27 members and ultimately approved by them by qualified majority.”

Leave campaigners such as Boris Johnson and Michael Gove have said there ”is no need to trigger Article 50 immediately, suggesting that first there should be a period of informal discussions with other EU members and the European Commission to iron out the main issues and a feasible timetable.”

  • Negotiate the UK’s Exit:

The main certain  question at the moment is who will do the negotiating for Britain? Who is strong enough to trigger article 50?

It’s good to consider that most of the senior members of the government – such as David Cameron, Chancellor George Osborne, Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond and Home Secretary Theresa May – are all Remain supporters and some of them may choose to depart when the PM stands down.

The BBC have said that during the campaign, the Leave side are ”happy for existing ministers and senior civil servants – including cabinet secretary Sir Jeremy Heywood – to lead the negotiations although they would expect senior Leave figures to play a very prominent role, as well as figures from other parties, business, law and civil society.”

Now, however, it seems certain the next prime minister – whoever they may be – will take charge of the process.

  •  Stable an unsettled Parliament:

The last process of extricating the UK from the EU, will ultimately involve rescinding the 1972 European Communities Act, the brief piece of legislation that brought the country into the European Economic Community, as it was then known, and which gives primacy to EU law in the UK.

It will also mean sifting through an estimated 80,000 pages of EU agreements, which have been enacted over the past five decades, to decide which will be repealed, amended or retained – a process which Parliament will want to oversee.

Parliament will ultimately have to ratify the treaty authorising UK withdrawal. Its good to consider that the majority of the UK’s 650 MPs were in favour of Britain staying in the EU and while they will have to respect the will of the British people, they will not be silent bystanders. This is where Brexit may be denied and stopped against the democracy of the UK. 

What do you make of Brexit? Will the UK be strong by the end of the process? Will the UK negotiate good deals and if so, under who? Will Brexit occur if parliaments MPs reject it?

Comment below YOUR views on Brexit and how the UK can be stronger outside the EU under a new leadership. 

Scotland to Veto Brexit? A possible 2nd EU Referendum?

Source: BBCBBC, Daily Mail

Despite the 51.8% of Britain’s who voted to leave the European Union on the 23rd of June, the SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon has announced that the SNP government could help to try and veto the decision by the democracy of UK citizens to leave the EU. She announced this in a BBC Sunday Politics Scotland programme.

After Scotland voted mostly in favour to remain in the EU, Ms Sturgeon has said that the people of Scotland have voted, clearly, to continue in membership of the European Union, with its attendant rights and responsibilities. It is her duty, she argues, to attempt to carry out that popular instruction.

What can Nicola Sturgeon do now? The BBC writer Brian Taylor (Scottish Political Editor) say’s ”She has said she will examine all options in consort with the European institutions and others to seek to secure continuing links with the EU for Scotland.”

”One of those options would be a second independence referendum – in order to allow Scotland to join/rejoin the EU in her own right, as a sovereign state.”

”But what about those other options? In particular, what about the suggestion that Ms Sturgeon might encourage the Scottish Parliament to seek to exercise a veto over the implementation of Brexit?”

Is a 2nd referendum possible?

Because the referendum was an Advisory one and not a permanent outcome, some rumor’s of a brexit blocking or a 2nd referendum, although a low chance of it occurring, could happen.

For example, The Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron has also announced his parties intentions to keep on fighting for the UK to have EU status. Another helping hand for this is a petition with around 3.6 million signatures on it to trigger a 2nd referendum by UK citizens. The petition quotes:

”We the undersigned call upon HM Government to implement a rule that if the remain or leave vote is less than 60% based a turnout less than 75% there should be another referendum.”

The 100,000 signatures needed for parliamentary debate has been hit, so we should see the petitions committee this week schedule a debate.

The former Labour Prime minister Tony Blair has also announced that a 2nd referendum could also happen. 

Party support, petition support and former prime minister support suggests these rumor’s shouldn’t be taken lightly, as the only thing stopping the UK from a brexit is going against democracy and triggering article 50 which gets a two year brexit process underway. Rejecting democracy from an advisory standpoint can happen although frowned upon, and after recent polls and news suggesting people are already regretting there vote to leave the EU, who knows what could happen.

So what do you think? Will Scotland Veto a Brexit? Will there be a 2nd Referendum? Will you like another chance at voting after witnessing the consequences so far of UK the Brexit vote?

Comment Below YOUR views on the SNP veto, the potential 2nd Referendum and consequences of Brexit so far. 

Corbyn Rejects Resignation: Unveils new Labour Shadow Cabinet

Source: BBC

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has recently lost 12 members of his shadow cabinet on Sunday and five shadow ministers on Monday – with most criticising his ‘mute’ performance in the EU referendum.

Labour seems to be imploding, forcing the labour leader to announce a new cabinet following the wave of resignations in protest at his leadership and despite public calls for him to resign.

Mr Corbyn has according to the BBC that ”he regretted the walkouts but pledged to stand in any new leadership election.”

Labour MPs are due to discuss a no confidence motion against Mr Corbyn.

Here are the latest re-shuffles and appointments to the Labour shadow cabinet:

The new appointments include: (BBC 2016)

  • Shadow foreign secretary – Emily Thornberry
  • Shadow health secretary – Diane Abbott
  • Shadow education secretary – Pat Glass
  • Shadow transport secretary – Andy McDonald
  • Shadow defence secretary – Clive Lewis
  • Shadow chief secretary to the Treasury – Rebecca Long-Bailey
  • Shadow international development secretary – Kate Osamor
  • Shadow environment food and rural affairs secretary – Rachel Maskell
  • Shadow voter engagement and youth affairs – Cat Smith
  • Shadow Northern Ireland secretary – Dave Anderson

The latest frontbench resignations came on Monday, by shadow foreign minister Diana Johnson, shadow civil society minister Anna Turley, shadow defence minister Toby Perkins, Wayne David, the shadow Cabinet Office, Scotland and justice minister and shadow consumer affairs and science minister Yvonne Fovargue.

The mass resignations were consequently triggered by the sacking of shadow foreign secretary Hilary Benn, in the early hours of Sunday, after he told Mr Corbyn he had lost confidence in him.

What’s your view of the Labour resignations?

Should Corbyn have stepped down? Will the new cabinet be effective in the next few years and reshape labour for the next general election? What did you make of Corbyn’s EU Referendum Campaigning?

Comment below YOUR views on Corbyn, Labour and Labours Pro-EU Referendum campaigning. 

 

My View of Brexit

Usually, I remain impartial when writing this blog, however after the obvious Brexit vote that has occurred I wish to voice my personal views of the outcome.

Personally, I am cautiously disappointed with the UK vote to leave the EU.

Hands up, I am still learning about political theory, facts and idea’s, so my personal thoughts may not be perfect, but I do have a large interest and passion for politics so I feel my views are valid. I also study it in parts at university, I write this political blog and I am also working in politics for my year-long placement as evidence for this.

Onto my in-depth view. After so many pre-warnings by top experts across many departments from the economists like the IMF, to the security folks like MI5, I am surprised at a brexit after some of the statements Vote Leave have come out with overtime. In terms of their biggest arguments for leave, I believed the 350million a week given to the EU that was written on the big red buses of vote leave was false, it was far less considering what we gain back from the EU and the rebates in place. I believed that Turkey were never close to joining the EU that Vote Leave stated in it’s leaflets, where around 79million people would have had access to come to the UK to live and work. I also believed that their arguments on ‘saving’ the NHS and sustaining the Economy were no where near as strong as Stronger In’s arguments.

Nevertheless, I am a big believer in the economy, pragmatism and state-collectivism and I believed working in a reformed European Union with the other 27 EU states was best for Britain overall. I believed the Economy would have thrived further in the EU, due to the free-trade act and deals we have within the 500 million+ (people strong) EU economy on offer. Speaking as a conservative, cosmopolitan and humanist, I believed the fact that people could have a more democratic chance of working and living across Europe and embrace the ever growing notion of globalisation was fundamentally positive for the UK to be a part of. I believed simply that the UK was better, stronger and safer in the EU. Now, I hope overtime these concepts can be used to keep the UK on track, stay strong economically and remain secure as a nation.

The EU is far from perfect, thats fact. Much needs to be changed overtime. However, I believed we should have stayed in the EU to voice our views at the table and help to change the EU system and bureaucracy for the better of all EU states. Uncertainty is now at large for the UK. Cameron will resign in October, the SNP want Scottish Independence, the pound has been hit hard and political carers such as Jeremy Corbyn and George Osborne are in turmoil just a day after leaving the EU. As a young 20 year-old male, I am nervous and cautious as to what the future holds, as it could be my generation that picks up any negative implications from a brexit overtime.

For those who wanted a Brexit, I now hope you can achieve all you voted for. For example, gaining back our ‘lost’ sovereignty, getting the job that migrants were taking from UK citizens and governing by our own rules and accepting the uncertainty that lies ahead. I also hope that you voted for the benefits that Brexit might give yourself and I hope you did not vote as a protest against the current government, or because you weren’t entirely sure what to do.

For those that wanted to stay, I hope that the UK can heal the potential wounds that have opened and we embrace the democratic decision that has occurred. I feel the UK will get back on track eventually as it’s within our nature to overcome uncertainty and turmoil. For instance, we have overcome major recessions, world wars and major domestic issues over the last century or so. This can be dealt with eventually.

I now hope the nation comes together and unites in the decision chosen. I hope the UK can now move on to negotiate good trade deals. I hope the UK can create fair migrant deals and those few MPs who wanted a brexit will especially do the UK justice. I hope the Pound will level out to after the large potential losses it faces. I also hope that Scotland will remain within the UK to keep it united and stronger, as well as Northern Ireland and Wales. Uncertainty is at large, but time is a great healer and hopefully the UK will eventually level out and be strong as an independent state with it’s own voice, laws and sovereignty under the right ideologies, government and UK voice.

Top bosses move to back Remain ahead of EU vote

Source: BBC

In an article by the BBC, it’s reported that top bosses including Sir Richard Branson, the Premier League chair and car industry executives have backed Remain ahead of Thursday’s EU vote.

Football:

Premier League chair Richard Scudamore said the 20 clubs in the top tier wanted to remain and that leaving would be “incongruous” in the context of the league’s commitment to “openness”.

Mr Scudamore further stated in a BBC Radio 5 live interview that leaving would be “incongruous” in the context of the league’s commitment to “openness”.

“There is an openness about the Premier League which I think it would be completely incongruous if we were to take the opposite position,” he said.

Entrepreneurs: 

Meanwhile, Sir Richard Branson has warned a British exit from the EU would be “devastating” for the UK’s long-term prosperity.

Sir Branson, who has long backed the Remain campaign, wrote an open letter, recalling “how difficult it was” for businesses to operate effectively before the EU, adding he was “saddened” at the prospect of returning to those days.

Car Industries:

Car industry trade bodies and the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders’ (SMMT), warned leaving the EU would increase costs and threaten jobs.

“Remaining will allow the UK to retain the influence on which the unique and successful UK automotive sector depends,” said chief executive Mike Hawes.

Directors at Toyota UK, Vauxhall, Jaguar Land Rover and BMW, as well as from component makers GKN and Magal Engineering, also voiced their support.

Soft Drinks Companies:

Drinks giant Diageo’s chief executive Ivan Menezes wrote to the company’s 4,773 UK employees, telling them that it would be “better for the UK, better for Diageo and better for the Scotch whisky industry that we remain in”.

Mr Menezes said Diageo benefited from ease of access to the European single market, as well as trade deals that the EU had negotiated with the rest of the world.

Backlash?

John Longworth, chair of Vote Leave business council, said the UK would be better off outside the EU.

“The single market isn’t a nirvana, it’s a mirage. The single market’s a protectionist area.

What do you make of this recent report?

Will this effect the voting polls knowing major Companies/individuals are remain minded? Can Vote Leave tackle the issues that these global companies/individuals are saying? How will the referendum turn out on the 23rd, a remain or leave result?

Comment Below YOUR views on Stronger In’s backing companies/individuals views. 

 

IMF says EU exit ‘largest near-term risk’ to British economy

Source: BBC

In a recent BBC business article, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has warned that a ”UK exit from the European Union (EU) could mean the UK misses out on up to 5.6% of GDP growth by 2019”

They (IMF) further state that a Brexit is the “largest near-term risk” to the UK economy, during the IMF’s annual UK economic outlook.

It added during the gathering that the “net economic effects would probably be ‘negative’ and ‘substantial.”

However, the Economists for the Brexit campaign state the “consensus that a UK exit would be bad for the economy was ‘based on flawed EU-centric models’.”

The IMF advisedly say that under its least adverse scenario for Brexit, by 2019 UK GDP would be 1.4% below what it would be should the UK vote to stay in the EU.

Its most adverse Brexit scenario predicts 2019 growth 5.6% below what it would otherwise have been, and also a drop in GDP in 2017 of 0.8%, which an IMF official described as a “recession”.

Under this scenario the UK would return to GDP growth of 2.9% in 2021. But the UK would have missed out on 4.5% of growth by then, according to the IMF.

‘Substantial Brexit costs’

Following a Brexit, the IMF finally said the UK would have to negotiate new trade terms with the EU if it wanted to stay in the single market.

If not, the UK could rely on World Trade Organisation rules, but this would ‘significantly raise trade barriers’, believe the IMF.

What do you make of the IMF brexit warning? Will the UK suffer economic consequences if it were to leave the EU? Will Brexit be able to negotiate trade deals quickly? 

Comment below YOUR views of the IMF’s Brexit warning