Top bosses move to back Remain ahead of EU vote

Source: BBC

In an article by the BBC, it’s reported that top bosses including Sir Richard Branson, the Premier League chair and car industry executives have backed Remain ahead of Thursday’s EU vote.

Football:

Premier League chair Richard Scudamore said the 20 clubs in the top tier wanted to remain and that leaving would be “incongruous” in the context of the league’s commitment to “openness”.

Mr Scudamore further stated in a BBC Radio 5 live interview that leaving would be “incongruous” in the context of the league’s commitment to “openness”.

“There is an openness about the Premier League which I think it would be completely incongruous if we were to take the opposite position,” he said.

Entrepreneurs: 

Meanwhile, Sir Richard Branson has warned a British exit from the EU would be “devastating” for the UK’s long-term prosperity.

Sir Branson, who has long backed the Remain campaign, wrote an open letter, recalling “how difficult it was” for businesses to operate effectively before the EU, adding he was “saddened” at the prospect of returning to those days.

Car Industries:

Car industry trade bodies and the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders’ (SMMT), warned leaving the EU would increase costs and threaten jobs.

“Remaining will allow the UK to retain the influence on which the unique and successful UK automotive sector depends,” said chief executive Mike Hawes.

Directors at Toyota UK, Vauxhall, Jaguar Land Rover and BMW, as well as from component makers GKN and Magal Engineering, also voiced their support.

Soft Drinks Companies:

Drinks giant Diageo’s chief executive Ivan Menezes wrote to the company’s 4,773 UK employees, telling them that it would be “better for the UK, better for Diageo and better for the Scotch whisky industry that we remain in”.

Mr Menezes said Diageo benefited from ease of access to the European single market, as well as trade deals that the EU had negotiated with the rest of the world.

Backlash?

John Longworth, chair of Vote Leave business council, said the UK would be better off outside the EU.

“The single market isn’t a nirvana, it’s a mirage. The single market’s a protectionist area.

What do you make of this recent report?

Will this effect the voting polls knowing major Companies/individuals are remain minded? Can Vote Leave tackle the issues that these global companies/individuals are saying? How will the referendum turn out on the 23rd, a remain or leave result?

Comment Below YOUR views on Stronger In’s backing companies/individuals views. 

 

Advertisements

ThePoliticsView on The EU Referendum: Overview, facts and a helpful insight

This is a personal blog into the EU Referendum by ThePoliticsView on the EU Referendum. This shall remain impartial, but strong views my be expressed in the process.

  1. What do we know about the EU? What does it do?

This should help explain each part of the EU and how Laws are made throughout it… It is run by the European Council which is effectively the head Government of each state inside the European Union. There are 28 states in the EU, so there are 28 head of states representing it. The UK’s head of Council is currently the Prime Minister David Cameron, who helps to negotiate the general direction in how EU laws are scrutinised and legislated.

The next part of the EU construct is the European Commission headed by Jean-Claude Juncker, who are nominated members selected by each head of state and the UK’s is currently Lord Hill, who was respectfully nominated by the PM David Cameron to represent the UK in the Commission. There are 28 Commissioners as each head of the 28 states elects one each. EU Commissioners effectively help to propose and come up with laws that follows the directions of the Councils ideas. Furthermore, these laws made by the Commissioners are passed down to the European Parliament. 

This part of the EU are elected members by each of the states citizens in European Elections held every four to five years by EU states. There are a total of 751 MEP’s elected across all nations in the EU, where 73 come from the UK.  MEP’s from the UK are elected regionally, which include conservative Ashley Fox from the South west, UKIP leader Nigel Farage from the South East to the SNP member Ian Hudghton up in Scotland. These members of the EU help to scrutinise and amend policies and laws given by the Commissioners which is what makes the EU more democratic.

These Laws are then passed down finally onto the Councils of the European Union, who are different sub-groups of the EU who help to put final amendments onto proposed laws from the powers above. For example, if a law was associated with Climate Change, the officials of each EU state associated with environmental matters would help to put their expertise on hand to finalise the the laws being made. Once each four of these EU categories can conclude and vote in favour of the laws proposed, they are made Law by Brussels power-heads and legislated into laws all states abide too.

Along the way, the EU court of Justice will make sure that law making is made fairly and suited to the cause. The European Central Bank helps to look after the economies of each state that acquire the Euro to make sure everyone is working well financially. The UK is excluded as they have the Pound and run their own system through home banking. Finally, the EU Court of Auditors makes sure that the EU states spend their money correctly to stop economic crises occurring such as a recession.

That was a LOT to take in right?! Although that was a rhetorical question, feel free to comment your views about ThePoliticsView of how the EU is run below.

2. Now onto people voting.

Obviously, on the 23rd June the UK has an EU Referendum to decide wether we stay or remain in the EU. Vote Leave want to ‘Leave’ the EU such as former London Mayor Boris Johnson and the Justice Security Michael Gove, and then the Stronger In campaigners want to remain in the EU, which include the PM David Cameron and The Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne. (click links for insights of each campaigns arguments)

Whether you agree or disagree with the campaigns, you need to make a decision yourself on whether to remain or leave, if you are eligible to do so. If you have registered, but are undecided or may not vote, you have time to do your research and let yourself decide what’s best for you. Don’t be scaremongered by the politics and look closer to home. If your life has been effected heavily by a migrant/immigrant, such as you’ve lost out on work, or a home because of one, maybe look to see what ‘Vote Leave’ says. If you already have a job and a good income, you may want to see what the ‘Stronger In’ side say, to see how the Economics behind leaving may effect you. It could mean you are worse off because of a potential rise in tax as the UK may leave the EU’s free trade market, but we’ll come onto the Negatives and Positives later.

If you are a sovereign person, you can argue ‘getting our country back’ as Nigel Farage states most of the time can reinstate sovereignty to the UK. However, ThePoliticsView argues that UK sovereignty will always exist either way for generations to come. Tea sipping, the Monarchy, Great British Bulldogs can and always will exist in a world that will hopefully not see another World War occur or the British Dying due to a freak disease only effecting UK citizens! In terms of voting, do what you feel is best and argue to yourself, ‘is life really that bad at the moment’? If the answer is no, then staying in the EU will not change your life as dramatically as leaving, and life will carry on as normal for years to come. If the answer is Yes, then perhaps a UK ‘Brexit’ can benefit you, but that all depends on things such as your economic state, your sovereign attitude and your willingness to accept potential economic failures/hardship and allowing people to come and live/work in the UK under certain rules.

       3. The Main Positives and Negatives of the EU. 

Enough of voting matters now, and onto the ‘Pros and Cons’ of the EU. The major positive supported by Britain Stronger in Europe Campaigners is the free trade market the UK accesses from it’s EU membership. This means trade around each of the 28 states is tariff/tax free, keeping prices low, VAT low and trading to become easier. It also allows people to come and offer their skills to improve the UK economy, filling both skilled jobs (like doctors, dentists ect) and laboured jobs (like builders, cleaners etc). However, this is also seen as a negative due to the free movement of people act as a rule of receiving free trade. This means any EU states citizen can live and work in another EU state almost without any restriction which causes over population and competition, especially in a place like the UK with all it’s benefits and growing economy. This is Vote Leaves main focus, because if we leave, they suggest the UK can control it’s boarders and limit the amount of people coming into the UK. On the other hand, David Cameron believes that if we stay, he has negotiated a ‘special status’ deal to make sure migrants have to get a job within a certain time period, speak english to working proficiency, not claim benefits right away and creditably offer something to the UK in four years or be ‘kicked out’.

One other thing to bare in mind is the Schengen Agreement. This means 26 of the 28 states (doesn’t include the UK or Ireland) ”allows for passport free travel through the 26 European states as participating countries have agreed not to impose border controls.” This makes it slightly harder for people to come into the UK and Ireland as they have to go through boarder checks to be allowed into the country. It’s a small act to consider as it allows the UK and Ireland to control it’s boarders better, potentially helping to stop fugitives and wanted terrorists to come freely into the UK or Ireland.

However, the main thing to take out of this, is the positive of free trade and the ‘sort of’ negative to the free movement of people. The free movement of people has been mostly made out to be negative thing because immigration/migration is the main focus of Vote Leave unlike Stronger In, who focus more on the Economic issues surrounding Brexit. 

        4. UK parties, where do they stand?

In terms of individual parties, The Conservatives are at a ’50/50′ of In and Outs due to split views of what’s best of the UK. (See links above for remain and leave arguments). The main In parties are firstly, Labour mainly because of the Workers Rights the EU offers. The Liberal Democrats because of various liberal ideas and ‘fairness’ EU laws give many people across the EU, such as the chance to live and work anywhere in the EU. The Greens because they feel the environment is a global matter to tackle and should be done with the alliances of other EU states. The SNP are the final major party to want remain due to the fact Scotland parliament wishes to remain in the EU.

Although these parties all want to remain, individual/groups of MP’s want to leave from each party also, who will work alongside essentially the entire UKIP party striving to fulfil their whole purpose. ‘Get our Country Back’. Other smaller parties like the BNP and Britain First are campaigning to leave based on similar, perhaps more facist views to the UKIP ideals.

      5. Has this helped? 

ThePoliticsView offers news and the chance for you to comment on political stories everyday, and we want to know if this helps you at all to decide where you stand on voting in the EU. We have tried to remain impartial as we can, by just stating facts and ideas from the campaigns and how it might effect you mostly when you go to cast your vote.

Please offer you insights on this blog in the comment section below and if you made it this far, thank you for reading this one off insight by ThePoliticsView! 

ITV debate: Farage and Cameron face EU questions: The Overview

Source: BBC

Last night saw a Referendum ‘grilling’ from a live audience towards the Eurosceptic leave campaigner Nigel Farage and the Europhile remain campaigner, the Prime Minister David Cameron. 

During the TV debate, Nigel Farage has said he has been “demonised” for his views on immigration as he and David Cameron faced questions in a live EU TV debate.

The UKIP leader faced accusations of “inflammatory” scaremongering during exchanges with members of the public.

But he insisted there was wide support for “getting a grip” on migration, including from ethnic minority groups.

The PM David Cameron said there were “good and bad ways” to control immigration but warned against a “Little England” stance.

Mr Farage and Mr Cameron did not debate head-to-head but appeared in turn on the ITV referendum special – hosted by Julie Etchingham – each facing half-an-hour of questions on the economy, immigration, security and sovereignty from the 200-strong audience.

So, what did they argue?

Nigel Farage 

According to the BBC, UKIP leader Nigel Farage, who was making the case for the UK to leave the EU, argued the 28-member union was “done for” economically and that even if UK firms had tariffs imposed on them after leaving, this would cost less than the amount the UK was currently giving to Brussels.

“No deal is better than the rotten deal that we have at the moment,” he said.

Furthermore, he pressed on the Leave campaign’s plans to stop EU migrants having the automatic right to live and work in the UK, Mr Farage said he accepted that migrants did make a contribution to the UK economy but “the real truth is that there is more to life than GDP” and the reality was that “ordinary decent Britons” had had “a rotten time” in recent years.

David Cameron

The BBC quote that when addressing the same audience, Mr Cameron outlined he was ‘frustrated’ by the EU, but this was not a justification for walking away, saying he wanted to lead a country that was a “fighter not a quitter”.

“The right thing to do is to fight for a great Britain in the EU and not take the Little England option of Nigel Farage,” he said.

He argued there was a growing consensus that a vote to leave the UK would “put jobs at risk and shrink the economy”, criticising Mr Farage for downplaying the economic arguments.

“GDP is the size of our economy. It is the combination of all the wealth our country creates. He (Farage) is basically saying it doesn’t really matter. He is so keen to get us out of Europe that he is prepared to sacrifice jobs and growth along the way.”

What’s YOUR view of the debate and the respective arguments?

Who was stronger during the live ITV debate? Who’s arguments were more encouraging for the UK to vote for? Who is leading in the Referendum race in your view, Remain or Leave?

Comment below your views on the debate and general Referendum arguments

G7: Brexit ‘serious risk to UK growth’

Source: BBC , mofa.go

This blog illustrates the G7’s point of view on ‘Brexit’.

The BBC have published in their article that a ”declaration at the G7 meeting in Japan says a vote by the UK to leave the European Union would pose a ‘serious threat to global growth’.”

”In its final statement, the group warned that a UK exit from the EU would reverse the trend of increased global trade, investment and jobs.”

”The meeting brings together the world’s leading seven industrialised nations.”

”The final communiqué set global growth as a priority for dealing with threats to the world’s economy and security.”

The BBC close to say that ”the warning about the economic consequences of the UK leaving the European Union comes as Britain prepares for a referendum on 23 June.Prime Minister David Cameron has been campaigning for Britain to stay within the 28-country bloc with recent polls suggesting a lead for those who support remaining within the EU.”

What’s YOUR view of the G7’s views of a UK exit from the European Union?

Should the G7 remain impartial to this, or can they voice their views that potentially sways the In campaigners votes? Will the G7’s views have a major influence on the way people might vote? Is the UK better off in or out of the EU?

Comment below your views of the G7’s involvement in the EU Referendum 

EU Referendum: Who argues what?

Source: BBC – Referendum Arguments Guide

This helpful article provides readers the chance to see who argues what in terms of each campaigning side.

As we know, the two respectful sides campaigning in the EU Referendum are firstly the Vote Leave Campaign, a group of eurosceptics aiming to exit the EU and this is simply known in other terms as ‘Brexit’. The other campaigners are called Britain Stronger in Europe, which as obvious as their counterparts are europhiles aiming to keep the UK in the European Union.

This BBC article is essentially a ”guide to find out the arguments from the Leave and Remain sides on a range of key topics.”

Britain goes to the polls on Thursday 23 June to decide whether the UK should stay a member of the European Union. Ultimately, this article could be beneficial for you to read and gauge where you stand when giving your vote on June 23rd, and seeing what side you feel speaks ‘more sense’. 

Highlighting some of the Key arguments within the article of both sides campaigning in the EU include:

  • Immigration
  • Sovereignty and Laws
  • Work and Pay
  • Trade and the Economy
  • Global Roles and Defence

More arguments are on the article, so go and check it out to find more about your curiosities!

ThePoliticsView asks, whats YOUR view of each sides arguments?

Who are more realistic and reliable in what each side claims? Who will get more votes on the 23rd of June and why? Who do you want to win?

Comment Below your view of the EU Referendum and arguments below

EU reform deal: What Cameron wanted and what he got

Source: BBC

This article is a slightly long dated one by the BBC, but it helps to put a reminder out to what Britain in a ‘re-formed’ European Union could look like, thanks to David Cameron’s lengthy negotiations back in February time.

It helps to give readers an insight of what Cameron wants Britain to be within a re-formed European Union if the UK decides to stay within the EU and what the overall negotiations came out to be.

What’s your views of Mr Cameron’s negotiations? Is it too much to ask for, or to challenging to occur do you feel? Will the UK be better off within the ‘re-formed’ EU membership it’s claimed to be?

Comment Below YOUR views on the UK’s potential stance in the EU if it votes to stay in the EU.

Obama: Post-Brexit trade deal with US could take 10 years

Source: BBC

In a recent BBC article, they have stated the following:

”The UK could take up to 10 years to negotiate trade deals with the US if it leaves the EU, Barack Obama has said.

In an interview, the US president said: “It could be five years from now, 10 years from now before we were able to actually get something done.”

Britain would also have less influence globally if it left, he added.

His warning over UK-US trade deals has angered campaigners for leaving the EU – with Mayor of London Boris Johnson calling his comments ‘hypocritical’.”

What’s YOUR view of this? 

Who’s side are you on more, an Obama view or a Boris Johnson view? Do you think Obama has a right to voice his views in the Referendum? Could it take years to negotiate a trade deal with the US if there is a brexit?

Comment Below your views in the comment section.

EU vote: Where the cabinet and other MPs stand

Source: BBC

Here is an article (highlighted above) to clarify where the leading cabinet ministers and general MP’s stand, either In or Out, regards to the EU Referendum.

Some key In members of the ‘Britain stronger in Europe’ campaign include:

  • Prime Minister David Cameron
  • Chancellor George Osborne
  • Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond
  • Home Secretary Theresa May

Some key Out members of the ‘Vote Leave’ campaign include:

  • Commons Leader Chris Grayling
  • Culture Secretary John Whittingdale
  • Northern Ireland Secretary Theresa Villiers
  • Justice Secretary Michael Gove

What’s YOUR view on the Referendum outcome? 

Simply said, will the UK remain within the EU, or lean towards a life-changing brexit of the EU?

Comment below below your views in the comment section

Chris Grayling: PM should stay if UK backs Brexit

Source: BBC

The leader of the house of commons and cabinet minister Chris Grayling has told the BBC that ”David Cameron should stay on as PM to lead negotiations with the EU if the UK votes to leave.”

”Although Mr Cameron is campaigning for the UK to remain in the European Union, many of his Conservative MPs, and some members of his own cabinet, are campaigning to leave.”

What’s YOUR view of this?

Should the PM David Cameron remain as the Prime Minister if the UK was to exit from the EU? If not, who firstly would be a better PM to have in place? If he remains, is he the best person to lead negotiations with the EU in a exited UK?  or who should someone else lead these negotiations?  If so, who?

Comment Below your views on this article

Lead EU referendum campaigns named

Source: BBC

This short blog emphasises briefly the two main campaign’s named in the upcoming european referendum for both the In and the Out Campaigners.

For the In campaign, the Britain Stronger in Europe group will lead this campaign to stay in the EU, which includes leading politicians PM David Cameron and Chancellor of the exchequer George Osborne.

On the other hand, the Vote Leave group will lead the Out campaign to exit the EU, including lead politicians such as Boris Johnson and Michael Gove.

According to the BBC, ”Vote Leave saw off a challenge from a rival campaign Grassroots Out, backed by UKIP leader Nigel Farage.”

Furthermore, ”The campaigns will be allowed to spend up to £7m, get a free mail-shot, TV broadcasts and £600,000 public funds.”

In your view, who do you think will win the campaigning for the EU Referendum? Simply asked, will we remain in the EU, or out? Who do you think is the stronger campaign group?

Comment below your views in the comment section below