Does there have to be a second Referendum?

SOURCE: BBC

The claim is that a referendum lock that was introduced by the coalition government in 2011, means that there will have to be a second referendum before the UK leaves the EU.

However, a BBC article states a reality check into this claim, saying it’s ”far from clear that there’s any legal requirement for a second referendum and, even if there were, the referendum lock could be repealed.”

The BBC state’s:

”The European Union Act 2011, passed by the coalition government, created a so-called “referendum lock”. Its purpose was to create a legal requirement to hold a referendum if any proposal were made to transfer further powers from the UK to the EU.”

”However, because of the way the Act is worded, some people have argued that it could be used to force a second referendum before the UK leaves the EU. It says that any new treaty that amends or replaces one of the existing primary EU treaties should be subject to a referendum before it can be ratified.”

So if it was subsequently the case that the 2011 act had created a requirement for a second referendum, it could be avoided anyway despite this, by simply repealing the act. It would mean having to see both Houses of Parliament agreeing to overturn the existing law. But it wouldn’t necessarily be particularly difficult.

Ultimately, as long as the government and Parliament are still agreeing that the referendum result should be enacted and accepted on behalf of the democratic vote, it’s hard to see any sort of legal obstacle occur that would be insuperable to the referendum result. Ultimately, Parliament makes the laws and has emphasised that its mostly in favour of what the outcome was, a vote to leave the European Union by 3.8%.

What do you make of calls for a 2nd Referendum?

Will it be legally simple to try to get another referendum going? Because its reported that people are regretting their decision to leave, can this sway parliament to think twice about accepting the democratic vote? Will the UK be better off outside the EU eventually?

Comment below YOUR views on the EU Referendum outcome and calls for a 2nd referendum 

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Brexit: What happens now the UK has voted for Independence from the EU?

Source: BBC

As is now known, the UK has voted to leave the EU – and has formulated a process that has come to be known as Brexit. Here is what is likely to happen next over the next few years.

  • A New Prime Minister is Needed Imminently:

As announced in a statement outside Downing Street, David Cameron has said the government would respect the result and carry out the instructions of the British people, reassuring the 2.9 million EU citizens in the UK that they will not be adversely affected.

Although his responsibility was to remain in No 10 to “steady the ship”, he announced he would step down in the autumn as he was not the right “captain to steer the country to its next destination”.

A new Conservative leader and prime minister is expected to be elected by 9 September.

Its widely reported that the Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has come under huge pressure from within his own party to consider his position, however he has insisted he will not step down.

Labour MPs have passed a motion of no confidence in Mr Corbyn, mainly due to there opinion of his weak leadership during the referendum campaign. As stated in the linked article above by ThePoliticsView, he is trying to fill gaps in his shadow cabinet following a wave of resignations.

Please note, this is not a formal mechanism for removing Mr Corbyn and he could survive even if the vote, should it take place, went against him.

  • Steady the Markets:

Market reaction to the referendum result was immediate and dramatic.

The BBC have announced that the FTSE 100 index of leading shares fell 8% after opening in London on Friday. Furthermore, there was a big sell-off of bank shares and house builders, with Barclays and RBS at one point down by more than 30%. By the end of trading, the index had bounced back, closing 2.8% down. The FTSE 250 index closed down 7% on Friday.

The value of the pound has also been hit hard on the foreign exchange markets, tumbling to lows not seen since 1985. At one stage, it hit $1.3305, a fall of more than 10%, although it too slightly recovered to close down 9% at $1.36.

The BBC have also written that the Chancellor George Osborne ”made a statement before the UK stock market opened on Monday in a bid to calm the markets. He said the UK was ready to face the future “from a position of strength” and indicated there would be no immediate emergency Budget.”

  • See how the EU leaders respond:

All EU leaders wanted the UK to stay in the bloc and a Leave vote has been met with disappointment and dismay across the Channel.

The BBC have said that ”hastily-convened meetings are taking place in Brussels and across foreign capitals on how to deal with the fallout of the UK’s decision, with the leaders of Germany, France and Italy meeting on Monday ahead of a wider EU summit later this week.”

European Council President Donald Tusk has appealed for unity among the EU’s 27 other members, saying the vote is historic but “not a moment for hysterical reactions”. German leader Angela Merkel said the vote was “regrettable” and a “watershed moment” for the EU.

  • Trigger Article 50:

There is a formal legal process for withdrawing from the EU – enshrined in Article 50 of the 2009 Lisbon Treaty – although it has never been invoked before.

Mr Cameron has said it should be up to his successor to decide when to activate Article 50 by notifying the European Council. Once this happens, the UK is cut out of EU decision-making at the highest level and there will be no way back unless by unanimous consent from all other member states.

Parliament and the BBC have said that ”quitting the EU is not an automatic process – it has to be negotiated with the remaining 27 members and ultimately approved by them by qualified majority.”

Leave campaigners such as Boris Johnson and Michael Gove have said there ”is no need to trigger Article 50 immediately, suggesting that first there should be a period of informal discussions with other EU members and the European Commission to iron out the main issues and a feasible timetable.”

  • Negotiate the UK’s Exit:

The main certain  question at the moment is who will do the negotiating for Britain? Who is strong enough to trigger article 50?

It’s good to consider that most of the senior members of the government – such as David Cameron, Chancellor George Osborne, Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond and Home Secretary Theresa May – are all Remain supporters and some of them may choose to depart when the PM stands down.

The BBC have said that during the campaign, the Leave side are ”happy for existing ministers and senior civil servants – including cabinet secretary Sir Jeremy Heywood – to lead the negotiations although they would expect senior Leave figures to play a very prominent role, as well as figures from other parties, business, law and civil society.”

Now, however, it seems certain the next prime minister – whoever they may be – will take charge of the process.

  •  Stable an unsettled Parliament:

The last process of extricating the UK from the EU, will ultimately involve rescinding the 1972 European Communities Act, the brief piece of legislation that brought the country into the European Economic Community, as it was then known, and which gives primacy to EU law in the UK.

It will also mean sifting through an estimated 80,000 pages of EU agreements, which have been enacted over the past five decades, to decide which will be repealed, amended or retained – a process which Parliament will want to oversee.

Parliament will ultimately have to ratify the treaty authorising UK withdrawal. Its good to consider that the majority of the UK’s 650 MPs were in favour of Britain staying in the EU and while they will have to respect the will of the British people, they will not be silent bystanders. This is where Brexit may be denied and stopped against the democracy of the UK. 

What do you make of Brexit? Will the UK be strong by the end of the process? Will the UK negotiate good deals and if so, under who? Will Brexit occur if parliaments MPs reject it?

Comment below YOUR views on Brexit and how the UK can be stronger outside the EU under a new leadership. 

EU referendum: Sir James Dyson says Britain better off out

Source: BBC, Telegraph

A big player in the vote for leave has recently come out, with the head of Dyson industries and billionaire Sir James Dyson announcing he is voting for Brexit.

The BBC have published that the inventor said the idea that Britain could not trade successfully outside the EU was “absolute cobblers”.

He said the single market did not work because exporters had to adapt products like his to cater for different languages and different types of plugs.

Britain Stronger in Europe said: “James Dyson wanted the UK to join the euro. He was wrong then and he is wrong now.”

Speaking to the Daily Telegraph, Sir James, who is best known for designing a bagless vacuum cleaner, said the UK “will create more wealth and more jobs by being outside the EU than we will within it”.

What’s your view of James Dyson’s Brexit remarks?

Will the UK be better off outside the EU? Will the UK adapt quickly to life outside the EU? Will the UK be able to negotiate trade agreements and migration barriers quickly?

Comment below YOUR views about the possible UK Brexit and the consequences of leaving the EU. 

EU Referendum: Who argues what?

Source: BBC – Referendum Arguments Guide

This helpful article provides readers the chance to see who argues what in terms of each campaigning side.

As we know, the two respectful sides campaigning in the EU Referendum are firstly the Vote Leave Campaign, a group of eurosceptics aiming to exit the EU and this is simply known in other terms as ‘Brexit’. The other campaigners are called Britain Stronger in Europe, which as obvious as their counterparts are europhiles aiming to keep the UK in the European Union.

This BBC article is essentially a ”guide to find out the arguments from the Leave and Remain sides on a range of key topics.”

Britain goes to the polls on Thursday 23 June to decide whether the UK should stay a member of the European Union. Ultimately, this article could be beneficial for you to read and gauge where you stand when giving your vote on June 23rd, and seeing what side you feel speaks ‘more sense’. 

Highlighting some of the Key arguments within the article of both sides campaigning in the EU include:

  • Immigration
  • Sovereignty and Laws
  • Work and Pay
  • Trade and the Economy
  • Global Roles and Defence

More arguments are on the article, so go and check it out to find more about your curiosities!

ThePoliticsView asks, whats YOUR view of each sides arguments?

Who are more realistic and reliable in what each side claims? Who will get more votes on the 23rd of June and why? Who do you want to win?

Comment Below your view of the EU Referendum and arguments below

David Cameron: There’s ‘a good case’ for new UK sovereignty law

Source: The BBC

The BBC have stated within their article that ”A new law reasserting the power of UK Parliament law over the EU could be passed, David Cameron has said, once his reform talks are concluded.”

”Mr Cameron, who is renegotiating Britain’s EU membership ahead of an in-out vote before 2018, said he was “very suspicious” of Brussels.”

They further to say that ”The prime minister has said he wants the UK to stay in a reformed European Union, but he has not ruled out campaigning to leave if he cannot secure the changes he wants.”

What’s your view on this?

What would happen to the UK, if we were to vote out of the EU? Would this law be a seriously considered one, if voted out? Is it a good or bad thing to leave? What’s your views on the EU vote?

Comment Below your EU views 

Jeremy Corbyn backs new law that could make companies pay their staff up to £1,200 a year more

Source: The Independent

The Independent understands that ”Jeremy Corbyn is considering a new law to force companies to share their profits with workers. A proposal to make businesses with 50 or more employees set aside at least 5 per cent of their total profits for staff has been endorsed by the Labour leader and will now be considered in an official review.”

What is your view on this?

Considering the linked article, will this help benefit equality within the workplace payouts to staff and bosses? Will this be a realistic policy to implement? Will businesses be effected majorly by this?

Comment Below your views (comment section)

Foreign affairs in Saudi Arabia ask the UK to ‘respect’ their death penalty laws

Source: The Independent

The foreign minister of Saudi Arabia Adel al-Jubeir, has come out to state that ‘In our country the death penalty is part of our laws and you have to respect this…’ when responding to a question over the kingdom’s “terrible image problem”, put to him by Channel 4 News’ (The Independent 2016)

The Independent further this to say ”The foreign minister’s comments come after international outcry over the Saudi kingdom’s execution of 47 prisoners in one day earlier this month. Among those put to death was the prominent Shia cleric and dissident Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr who was a vocal supporter of the mass anti-government protests that flared up in the kingdom’s oil-rich Eastern Province in 2011.”

What’s your view on this? Should the death penalty still exist in the world? Should the UK inherit the death penalty into Laws? Do you respect the Saudi Arabian’s use of the death penalty in recent years?

Comment Below your views

Gardener jailed for life after stabbing customer to death

Source: The telegraph

Tragically in recent news, the telegraph state that ”A gardener who murdered an elderly customer in a brutal attack in which he stabbed him more than 40 times, has been jailed for life.”

The murderer David Hall, 48, has had many historical issues with the police, including, In October 2014, where he ”stole £557.80 from a Costa Coffee and was accused of burgling customers’ homes.”

”He then secretly moved to Portsmouth.”

”Mr Plater’s gave him “second chance” despite calls from his family to let Hall go, presumably due to his ‘odd’ behaviours. 

Whats your view on this? Obviously its a travesty, and the murderer has been sentenced to life inprisonment as an act of justice, but should more be done in rural security, to stop aspects like this happening and keep in track of people like hall with criminal records? Should police in Portsmouth done more to keep Hall in the ‘local eye’, due to his historic criminal record, to potentially stop this from happening?

This is a difficult one for sure but please Comment Below to express your view.