Brexit Report: Article 50 will be triggered and the UK will leave the single market

SOURCES: BBC

Back in October, ThePoliticsView published an article outlining most of the major political news that occurred in September and October 2016. 

In terms of the UK perspective, it outlined how former UKIP leader Diane James had resigned, triggering a new leadership election for the party to occur. It turns out the new leader voted in was Paul Nuttall, UKIP MEP for the North West of England. He now will contest in February’s Stoke Central by-election after it was triggered by the labour party following the resignation of former labour MP Tristram Hunt.

It also stated that Jeremy Corbyn had won the leadership election for Labour, beating contestant Owen Smith to hold his spot as The Labour Party leader. Tristram Hunt was a known critic of Corbyn, hence partly why he resigned, as well as former Copeland MP Jamie Reed who’s resignation has triggered a by-election in Copeland on the same day as Stoke Central, 23rd February.

The Liberal Democrats have shown a resurgence of late winning multiple council elections and the Parliamentary by-election in Richmond where new MP Sarah Olney beat former Conservative MP, turned Independent Zac Goldsmith over the Heathrow Expansion row.  They are clearly aiming to appeal to remain voters after constantly addressing the issues of leaving the EU and critiquing the Conservative Governments Brexit plans.

But how has the following come to fruition?

Simply, you could argue one word has created this change. Brexit.

The country voted for Brexit on June 23rd, and despite numerous of stories and attempts for a Veto on Brexit; including a high court lawsuit against the Government to allow a Parliamentary vote on Article 50, it’s happening sooner than later.

The September/October summary also expanded on how Prime Minister Theresa May has promised Brexit will happen by March 2017.  This is now inevitably going to happen sometime in late March, early April time.

Article 50 will be triggered and the UK is leaving the EU.

Theresa May has stated already that the UK must leave the single market, tighten immigration into the UK and be a world leader in free-trade. 

She has also proclaimed that the two+ year process that Article 50 gives towards leaving the EU, will be heavily negotiated to put the UK first.

She now wants free-trade trade deals for the UK across the globe with other nations as a consequence of leaving the single market the EU allows access members to.

This all sounds rather promising and encouraging despite what critics say. Some say it’s easier said than done, some say it can be done, but it won’t be easy.

It for sure won’t be easy. The UK will now have to intensely lobby the EU to allow the UK to leave with as many benefits as possible. The reason it will be tough, is due to the so-called bureaucracy and stubbornness the EU has in place and the fact they won’t let the UK have to many benefits from Brexit, in case other eurosceptic nations follow suit to a Brexit in there own way.

This is why the UK is accepting it has to leave the single market. There is little to no chance of keeping free market status, if the UK is wanting to stop the freedom of movement into the State. That is a simple fact.

So what will the UK hope to look like post Brexit come 2018/2019 or beyond? In summary:

  • The UK will be officially independent and out of the EU.
  • The freedom of movement into the UK will be stopped.
  • The UK will be out of the Single Market.
  • The UK will begin or expand on free-trade deals globally.
  • The UK will begin to open trade deals with the EU states, hoping to be Tariff and Tax free.
  • The UK will prepare for the 2020 General Election.

That is a basic summary of what the UK will want to look like according to the Prime Minister Theresa May. Will this be the case? It’s very difficult to say. But optimism is essential and the Government will need to go into talks with the EU representing not only the people who voted to leave, but the people who wanted to remain also.

This is going to be the one of the most difficult and uncertain times in UK political history, especially since the 1st and 2nd World War’s.

Not only that, but the UK itself finds themselves in a battle to keep itself together, especially after Scotland’s Leader Nicola Sturgeon is undoubtably going to attempt to trigger another Scottish Independence Referendum before the new decade, after their access to the free-market will be stopped.

Turbulence is undoubtedly expected, but as stated, the UK will leave the EU in some form.

The question is, how do you think the UK will get on both during negotiations, and post negotiations with the EU? 

Will we acquire good trade deals globally?

Will Scotland become independent? 

Will the Conservatives win the 2020 General Election?

Will UKIP be relevant over the next 4-5 years?

Comment your views on Brexit, the UK, UK parties during the Brexit process and a possible Scottish Referendum below

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Pro-Brexit MP Gisela Stuart claims ‘EU citizens are currently being left in limbo’ by the Government

SOURCE: BBC

One of the leading Vote Leave figures Gisela Stuart has said EU citizens in the UK have been “left in limbo” since the referendum result to leave the European Union.

Furthermore, the Labour MP is expected to head a research project on how to protect EU migrant rights after the UK leaves the EU.

It will be a cross-party inquiry for the British Future think tank to examine what kind of legal status’ could be granted to EU citizens in the UK, in time before the process to leave the EU starts by the inevitable triggering of Article 50.

Many Ministers have indicated strongly that they want to protect EU citizens’ status – as long as a reciprocal deal can be negotiated.

It’s reported that multiple MPs from all parties have attacked the government’s stance, saying people “are not bargaining chips”.

Ms Stuart, the former co-chair of the Vote Leave campaign, has stated the government should quickly outline that all EU citizens in the UK – about three million people – will be allowed to stay after Brexit.

She further states that the government should “take the initiative” and emphasize their intentions to protect UK-EU citizens’ rights and that it expected the same treatment for UK nationals abroad.

She also believes Ministers should demonstrate that leaving the EU “doesn’t mean that we’re ignoring people’s rights”.

Meanwhile, the Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron believes it’s “pretty shameful” for Ms Stuart to be “claiming to be worried” about the rights of EU citizens.

He said she had been part of a campaign that “whipped up anti-immigrant feeling” and “contributed to an increase of hate crimes against Europeans”.

“It is like the arsonist turning round and saying they are surprised that a fire took hold,” Mr Farron has said.

Lastly, David Davis, the newly named Brexit secretary by new Prime Minister Theresa May, will oversee the negotiations on the UK’s exit from the European Union, and has said that he wants to secure a “generous settlement” for both EU nationals in the UK, and British citizens abroad.

Ministers have said it would be “unwise” to fully “guarantee” EU citizens’ rights without a deal for Britons abroad.

What do you make of the uncertainty behind EU citizens rights living in the UK?

Do the government need to state and maintain transparent and accountable help towards EU migrants living in the UK quickly? Will the government fully help EU migrants living in the UK?

Comment your views on EU migrant rights below

Scotland to Veto Brexit? A possible 2nd EU Referendum?

Source: BBCBBC, Daily Mail

Despite the 51.8% of Britain’s who voted to leave the European Union on the 23rd of June, the SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon has announced that the SNP government could help to try and veto the decision by the democracy of UK citizens to leave the EU. She announced this in a BBC Sunday Politics Scotland programme.

After Scotland voted mostly in favour to remain in the EU, Ms Sturgeon has said that the people of Scotland have voted, clearly, to continue in membership of the European Union, with its attendant rights and responsibilities. It is her duty, she argues, to attempt to carry out that popular instruction.

What can Nicola Sturgeon do now? The BBC writer Brian Taylor (Scottish Political Editor) say’s ”She has said she will examine all options in consort with the European institutions and others to seek to secure continuing links with the EU for Scotland.”

”One of those options would be a second independence referendum – in order to allow Scotland to join/rejoin the EU in her own right, as a sovereign state.”

”But what about those other options? In particular, what about the suggestion that Ms Sturgeon might encourage the Scottish Parliament to seek to exercise a veto over the implementation of Brexit?”

Is a 2nd referendum possible?

Because the referendum was an Advisory one and not a permanent outcome, some rumor’s of a brexit blocking or a 2nd referendum, although a low chance of it occurring, could happen.

For example, The Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron has also announced his parties intentions to keep on fighting for the UK to have EU status. Another helping hand for this is a petition with around 3.6 million signatures on it to trigger a 2nd referendum by UK citizens. The petition quotes:

”We the undersigned call upon HM Government to implement a rule that if the remain or leave vote is less than 60% based a turnout less than 75% there should be another referendum.”

The 100,000 signatures needed for parliamentary debate has been hit, so we should see the petitions committee this week schedule a debate.

The former Labour Prime minister Tony Blair has also announced that a 2nd referendum could also happen. 

Party support, petition support and former prime minister support suggests these rumor’s shouldn’t be taken lightly, as the only thing stopping the UK from a brexit is going against democracy and triggering article 50 which gets a two year brexit process underway. Rejecting democracy from an advisory standpoint can happen although frowned upon, and after recent polls and news suggesting people are already regretting there vote to leave the EU, who knows what could happen.

So what do you think? Will Scotland Veto a Brexit? Will there be a 2nd Referendum? Will you like another chance at voting after witnessing the consequences so far of UK the Brexit vote?

Comment Below YOUR views on the SNP veto, the potential 2nd Referendum and consequences of Brexit so far. 

ThePoliticsView on The EU Referendum: Overview, facts and a helpful insight

This is a personal blog into the EU Referendum by ThePoliticsView on the EU Referendum. This shall remain impartial, but strong views my be expressed in the process.

  1. What do we know about the EU? What does it do?

This should help explain each part of the EU and how Laws are made throughout it… It is run by the European Council which is effectively the head Government of each state inside the European Union. There are 28 states in the EU, so there are 28 head of states representing it. The UK’s head of Council is currently the Prime Minister David Cameron, who helps to negotiate the general direction in how EU laws are scrutinised and legislated.

The next part of the EU construct is the European Commission headed by Jean-Claude Juncker, who are nominated members selected by each head of state and the UK’s is currently Lord Hill, who was respectfully nominated by the PM David Cameron to represent the UK in the Commission. There are 28 Commissioners as each head of the 28 states elects one each. EU Commissioners effectively help to propose and come up with laws that follows the directions of the Councils ideas. Furthermore, these laws made by the Commissioners are passed down to the European Parliament. 

This part of the EU are elected members by each of the states citizens in European Elections held every four to five years by EU states. There are a total of 751 MEP’s elected across all nations in the EU, where 73 come from the UK.  MEP’s from the UK are elected regionally, which include conservative Ashley Fox from the South west, UKIP leader Nigel Farage from the South East to the SNP member Ian Hudghton up in Scotland. These members of the EU help to scrutinise and amend policies and laws given by the Commissioners which is what makes the EU more democratic.

These Laws are then passed down finally onto the Councils of the European Union, who are different sub-groups of the EU who help to put final amendments onto proposed laws from the powers above. For example, if a law was associated with Climate Change, the officials of each EU state associated with environmental matters would help to put their expertise on hand to finalise the the laws being made. Once each four of these EU categories can conclude and vote in favour of the laws proposed, they are made Law by Brussels power-heads and legislated into laws all states abide too.

Along the way, the EU court of Justice will make sure that law making is made fairly and suited to the cause. The European Central Bank helps to look after the economies of each state that acquire the Euro to make sure everyone is working well financially. The UK is excluded as they have the Pound and run their own system through home banking. Finally, the EU Court of Auditors makes sure that the EU states spend their money correctly to stop economic crises occurring such as a recession.

That was a LOT to take in right?! Although that was a rhetorical question, feel free to comment your views about ThePoliticsView of how the EU is run below.

2. Now onto people voting.

Obviously, on the 23rd June the UK has an EU Referendum to decide wether we stay or remain in the EU. Vote Leave want to ‘Leave’ the EU such as former London Mayor Boris Johnson and the Justice Security Michael Gove, and then the Stronger In campaigners want to remain in the EU, which include the PM David Cameron and The Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne. (click links for insights of each campaigns arguments)

Whether you agree or disagree with the campaigns, you need to make a decision yourself on whether to remain or leave, if you are eligible to do so. If you have registered, but are undecided or may not vote, you have time to do your research and let yourself decide what’s best for you. Don’t be scaremongered by the politics and look closer to home. If your life has been effected heavily by a migrant/immigrant, such as you’ve lost out on work, or a home because of one, maybe look to see what ‘Vote Leave’ says. If you already have a job and a good income, you may want to see what the ‘Stronger In’ side say, to see how the Economics behind leaving may effect you. It could mean you are worse off because of a potential rise in tax as the UK may leave the EU’s free trade market, but we’ll come onto the Negatives and Positives later.

If you are a sovereign person, you can argue ‘getting our country back’ as Nigel Farage states most of the time can reinstate sovereignty to the UK. However, ThePoliticsView argues that UK sovereignty will always exist either way for generations to come. Tea sipping, the Monarchy, Great British Bulldogs can and always will exist in a world that will hopefully not see another World War occur or the British Dying due to a freak disease only effecting UK citizens! In terms of voting, do what you feel is best and argue to yourself, ‘is life really that bad at the moment’? If the answer is no, then staying in the EU will not change your life as dramatically as leaving, and life will carry on as normal for years to come. If the answer is Yes, then perhaps a UK ‘Brexit’ can benefit you, but that all depends on things such as your economic state, your sovereign attitude and your willingness to accept potential economic failures/hardship and allowing people to come and live/work in the UK under certain rules.

       3. The Main Positives and Negatives of the EU. 

Enough of voting matters now, and onto the ‘Pros and Cons’ of the EU. The major positive supported by Britain Stronger in Europe Campaigners is the free trade market the UK accesses from it’s EU membership. This means trade around each of the 28 states is tariff/tax free, keeping prices low, VAT low and trading to become easier. It also allows people to come and offer their skills to improve the UK economy, filling both skilled jobs (like doctors, dentists ect) and laboured jobs (like builders, cleaners etc). However, this is also seen as a negative due to the free movement of people act as a rule of receiving free trade. This means any EU states citizen can live and work in another EU state almost without any restriction which causes over population and competition, especially in a place like the UK with all it’s benefits and growing economy. This is Vote Leaves main focus, because if we leave, they suggest the UK can control it’s boarders and limit the amount of people coming into the UK. On the other hand, David Cameron believes that if we stay, he has negotiated a ‘special status’ deal to make sure migrants have to get a job within a certain time period, speak english to working proficiency, not claim benefits right away and creditably offer something to the UK in four years or be ‘kicked out’.

One other thing to bare in mind is the Schengen Agreement. This means 26 of the 28 states (doesn’t include the UK or Ireland) ”allows for passport free travel through the 26 European states as participating countries have agreed not to impose border controls.” This makes it slightly harder for people to come into the UK and Ireland as they have to go through boarder checks to be allowed into the country. It’s a small act to consider as it allows the UK and Ireland to control it’s boarders better, potentially helping to stop fugitives and wanted terrorists to come freely into the UK or Ireland.

However, the main thing to take out of this, is the positive of free trade and the ‘sort of’ negative to the free movement of people. The free movement of people has been mostly made out to be negative thing because immigration/migration is the main focus of Vote Leave unlike Stronger In, who focus more on the Economic issues surrounding Brexit. 

        4. UK parties, where do they stand?

In terms of individual parties, The Conservatives are at a ’50/50′ of In and Outs due to split views of what’s best of the UK. (See links above for remain and leave arguments). The main In parties are firstly, Labour mainly because of the Workers Rights the EU offers. The Liberal Democrats because of various liberal ideas and ‘fairness’ EU laws give many people across the EU, such as the chance to live and work anywhere in the EU. The Greens because they feel the environment is a global matter to tackle and should be done with the alliances of other EU states. The SNP are the final major party to want remain due to the fact Scotland parliament wishes to remain in the EU.

Although these parties all want to remain, individual/groups of MP’s want to leave from each party also, who will work alongside essentially the entire UKIP party striving to fulfil their whole purpose. ‘Get our Country Back’. Other smaller parties like the BNP and Britain First are campaigning to leave based on similar, perhaps more facist views to the UKIP ideals.

      5. Has this helped? 

ThePoliticsView offers news and the chance for you to comment on political stories everyday, and we want to know if this helps you at all to decide where you stand on voting in the EU. We have tried to remain impartial as we can, by just stating facts and ideas from the campaigns and how it might effect you mostly when you go to cast your vote.

Please offer you insights on this blog in the comment section below and if you made it this far, thank you for reading this one off insight by ThePoliticsView! 

Tim Farron: UK democracy needs Liberal Democrats recovery

Source: BBC

ThePoliticsView hasn’t delved much into the UK party of the Liberal Democrats of recent, perhaps due to their decline in presence since their unsuccessful general election campaign. However, one election that the liberals are renown for doing respectively well in, is the local elections with on coming up on May 5th.  

The article above from the BBC publishes the words of Liberal Democrat Leader Tim Farron, who states the following from his BBC interview:

 “it is in the interests of British democracy” that the Lib Dems recover in next week’s UK-wide elections.

Furthermore, the Lib Dem leader conceded his party had “a battle” on its hands.

But he said Labour’s woes present it with a “huge opportunity” to show itself as “an effective opposition”.

He claims membership has increased by 50% since last year’s general election, when the party was nearly wiped out at Westminster.

What’s your views on the Liberal Democrats?

Are the Party on the rise again? Are they an essential part of British democracy? Is the UK becoming even more party v party then before, between Labour and the Conservatives? Will they do well in the local elections?

Comment Below your views on the liberal democrats and Mr Farron’s words.

Is Britain more left wing than people think?

Source: The Independent, LSE

The Independent have published a ‘pro left wing’ article, discussing how ”the centre ground of British politics could be further to the left than generally thought, according to new research.”

They further this to say, ”A study into the responses of a cross-section of voters who declared a strong allegiance to the Conservatives, Labour, Greens, Liberal Democrats, SNP and UKIP, suggested that many are more left-wing than they believe themselves to be.”

What’s your view of this?

Is this just a way of trying to promote liberal politics? Do you believe that the UK is starting to become more left wing now? Where do you stand politically and why?

Comment Below your views