Diane James is named as UKIP’s new Party Leader

SOURCE: BBC

The Greens have named Caroline Lucas and Jonathan Bartley as their co-leaders, Labour will announce there’s soon and now UKIP have named Diane James as their newly elected Party Leader.

UK politics has officially been ‘re-designed’ post voting to exit from the EU, with a completely new direction as to where the UK goes and how it’s governed.

The news of Diane James’ victory for UKIP leadership came yesterday at UKIP’s party conference yesterday.

Below outlines the results:

Diane James 8,451
Lisa Duffy 4,591
Bill Etheridge 2,052
Phillip Broughton 1,544
Elizabeth Jones 1,203

Source: BBC 2016

New leader Diane James, a prominent Vote Leave campaigner,  stated in her opening speech that the Prime Minster Theresa May has to “get on with getting the UK out of the EU”.

Ms James had been strongly regarded as the favourite to succeed Nigel Farage, who has quit as it’s leader following the UK’s vote to leave the EU. He feels that his ‘job is done’ and he has ‘given his all to the party’.

MEP Ms James, won with 8,451 votes, ahead of Lisa Duffy in 2nd, who received 4,591.

She said UKIP was “the opposition party in waiting” and said the Tories “cannot be trusted with true Brexit”.

“The threats to the referendum outcome are increasing by the day,” she said, adding she would reject “Brexit-lite”.

UKIP is known to now be the ‘face of UK Euroscepticism’ for nearly two decades. Mr Farage bows out by helping turn UKIP from a fringe party, into one of the biggest parties in UK politics – in terms of votes at the 2015 general election. He also independently helped towards persuading more than 17 million people to vote to leave the EU.

Ms James further said that UKIP had “moved mountains on the political landscape” and was the “change movement of the United Kingdom”.  She quotes: “I believe in UKIP’s values of liberty, common sense, democracy and pragmatic approaches to the challenges this country faces.”

She ended by telling the party conference that she might use ‘different language’ and be ‘less frank’ than Mr Farage, but she would be honest and “uphold all the beliefs and values that this party stands for”.

When directing this at the Prime Minister, she said: “If you’re watching this afternoon, you’ll be watching the opposition party in waiting.”

What do you make of UKIP’s newly elected leader Diane James?

Will she hold the government into account for Brexit? Will she be a good leader for UKIP? What will she put onto the table for UK politics in the ear of Article 50 and Brexit?

Comment your views on Diane James and UKIP below 

Theresa May reportedly rejects Australian Points-Based system used for EU nationals

SOURCE: BBC

The Australian Points-Based System in which Vote Leave campaigners constantly addressed to be the way in which the UK would assess and bring in other EU nationals post-brexit was today declined as appropriate by the Prime Minister Theresa May.

Her reported rejection towards this particular immigration system came within China, where the PM has reportedly denied she had ‘gone soft’ on migration and further stated that people backed Brexit because they wanted ‘an element of control’.

She further stated that a points-based model “would not let the government control arrivals”.

The Ex-UKIP leader Nigel Farage said many people had voted Leave because of this policy, also verbally backed by others such as Boris Johnson and Michael Gove.

Although it was known that Mrs May supported remaining in the EU, she has constantly stated that the Brexit vote “must be respected” and further suggested that “curbs on the current free movement of EU citizens into the UK would be a red line in future negotiations with the EU”.

Speaking to multiple journalists and news reporters in China, she dismissed Vote Leave’s proposal of an ‘Australian-style points system’ that would ultimately decide the number of ‘skilled and unskilled’ workers who could come to live and work in the UK every year from the EU and beyond – with numbers to be determined by MPs.

Mrs May highlighted that rather than giving the government control, such a system would “allow anybody into the UK if they met the criteria”, also adding that curbs on student visas had “been a more effective measure to reduce immigration.”

Mrs May also indicated that EU citizens may continue to have their rights to live and work in the UK after Brexit.

What do you make of Theresa May rejecting this particular system of tackling Immigration?

How else can the UK deal with it’s Immigration levels? Is this Australian system the best option for the UK? If you voted to leave the EU, how much did immigration play upon your reasons to vote leave? Was it the major reason behind why you voted to leave?

To find out more about the Australian-Points system, go to this following link. 

Comment your views on how the UK should deal with it’s immigration below

UKIP Leadership Race: Steven Woolfe Excluded From The Race After Late Application

SOURCE: BBC

By September, there will be leadership elections for Labour, The Greens and UKIP after the backlash of the EU Referendum sparked resignations and inner party conflicts (apart from the Greens who’s leader Natalie Bennett decided to step down before the EU Referendum).

The Conservatives also were expected to have a new leader in September, however one of the two in the Tory race Andrea Leadsom stood down from the race, meaning Theresa May became the new Prime Minister and Conservative Party Leader.

The article specifically delves upon UKIP’s race, a growing story after being shadowed by the recent Labour Party feuds effecting Jeremy Corbyn as leader, with votes of no confidence given to him by his own MP’s after their public disapproval over his Referendum performance was clearly shown.

Ms Angela Eagle, the former Shadow Business Secretary prompted the backlash through announcing her bid to become Labour Leader. Owen Smith, the current and only person challenging Corbyn to become Labour Leader, then shortly stepped up to the chase in being the new Labour Leader.

However, Angela Eagle stood down from the race, leaving only Owen Smith and Jeremy Corbyn, the current leader, to battle it out for Labour Leadership Status.

So now the Tory race it well and truly over, and the labour leadership race has quietened down slightly, UKIP have no become the news/public eye for leadership races.

Recently, the main UKIP leadership hopeful Steven Woolfe has been ruled ‘ineligible’ to stand in the contest to replace Nigel Farage – after he submitted his papers late. It was reported to be around 17 minutes late. 

This is big news, because according to the BBC, the party’s National Executive Committee (NEC) said it had voted by a ‘clear majority’ to exclude Mr Woolfe – previously seen as the frontrunner.

The MEP said he was ‘extremely disappointed’ by the decision, and three NEC members have quit in protest.

So here are the list of people who are on the UKIP ballot:

  • Jonathan Arnott
  • Bill Etheridge
  • Diane James
  • Lisa Duffy
  • Phillip Broughton
  • Elizabeth Jones

Speaking to the BBC, Mr Woolfe said he believed the NEC had ‘their own reasons’ for excluding him from the ballot, but implied it could have been linked to the fact he was committed to abolishing the executive.

The winner of the leadership contest – which was sparked by Mr Farage’s decision to stand down after the UK voted to leave the EU – is scheduled to be announced on 15 September.

Finally, In a statement announcing the final line-up, the party said: “By a clear majority of NEC members Steven Woolfe MEP’s application was considered to be ineligible as a result of a late submission and as such he did not meet the eligibility criteria.”

What do you make of the recent UKIP leadership movements?

Should Steven Woolfe have been accepted as a candidate, despite handing his application in late? What do you make of the current nominations list? Who do you think will win the UKIP leadership race?

Comment below your views on the UKIP leadership race

Nigel Farage stands down as UKIP Leader

SOURCE: BBC

The nationalist UKIP leader Nigel Farage is one of many contributors (perhaps of the more controversial contributors) over the years to campaign for UK independence from the EU. After just a few weeks after the EU Referendum outcome which saw the UK exit from the EU, Nigel Farage has today stood down from his UKIP leadership role. 

In his speech, Mr Farage said his “political ambition has been achieved” with the UK having voted to leave the EU.

The BBC have quoted to say Farage outlined the party was in a “pretty good place” and said he would not change his mind about quitting as he did after the 2015 general election.

Furthermore, he said leading UKIP was “tough at times” but “all worth it” said Mr Farage, who is also an MEP. He added that the UK needed a “Brexit prime minister”.

Mr Farage said the party would campaign against “backsliding” on the UK’s exit from the EU, saying he planned to see out his term in the European Parliament – describing his party as “the turkeys that voted for Christmas”.

He said his party’s “greatest potential” lay in attracting Labour voters. He will not be backing any particular candidate to replace him.

Deputy Leader Paul Nuttall and Douglas Carswell MP are favourites to take over the UKIP leadership role.

Mr Farage finished by announcing his decision to stand aside in a speech in London, saying: “I want my life back, and it begins right now.”

He has been leader of UKIP for most of the past eight years, standing down briefly in 2009 and being re-elected the following year.

What are your views on Nigel Farage?

Did he serve UKIP well? Was his Referendum campaigning fair? Who will take over him as UKIP Leader?

Comment below your views on Nigel Farage and UKIP below

ThePoliticsView on The EU Referendum: Overview, facts and a helpful insight

This is a personal blog into the EU Referendum by ThePoliticsView on the EU Referendum. This shall remain impartial, but strong views my be expressed in the process.

  1. What do we know about the EU? What does it do?

This should help explain each part of the EU and how Laws are made throughout it… It is run by the European Council which is effectively the head Government of each state inside the European Union. There are 28 states in the EU, so there are 28 head of states representing it. The UK’s head of Council is currently the Prime Minister David Cameron, who helps to negotiate the general direction in how EU laws are scrutinised and legislated.

The next part of the EU construct is the European Commission headed by Jean-Claude Juncker, who are nominated members selected by each head of state and the UK’s is currently Lord Hill, who was respectfully nominated by the PM David Cameron to represent the UK in the Commission. There are 28 Commissioners as each head of the 28 states elects one each. EU Commissioners effectively help to propose and come up with laws that follows the directions of the Councils ideas. Furthermore, these laws made by the Commissioners are passed down to the European Parliament. 

This part of the EU are elected members by each of the states citizens in European Elections held every four to five years by EU states. There are a total of 751 MEP’s elected across all nations in the EU, where 73 come from the UK.  MEP’s from the UK are elected regionally, which include conservative Ashley Fox from the South west, UKIP leader Nigel Farage from the South East to the SNP member Ian Hudghton up in Scotland. These members of the EU help to scrutinise and amend policies and laws given by the Commissioners which is what makes the EU more democratic.

These Laws are then passed down finally onto the Councils of the European Union, who are different sub-groups of the EU who help to put final amendments onto proposed laws from the powers above. For example, if a law was associated with Climate Change, the officials of each EU state associated with environmental matters would help to put their expertise on hand to finalise the the laws being made. Once each four of these EU categories can conclude and vote in favour of the laws proposed, they are made Law by Brussels power-heads and legislated into laws all states abide too.

Along the way, the EU court of Justice will make sure that law making is made fairly and suited to the cause. The European Central Bank helps to look after the economies of each state that acquire the Euro to make sure everyone is working well financially. The UK is excluded as they have the Pound and run their own system through home banking. Finally, the EU Court of Auditors makes sure that the EU states spend their money correctly to stop economic crises occurring such as a recession.

That was a LOT to take in right?! Although that was a rhetorical question, feel free to comment your views about ThePoliticsView of how the EU is run below.

2. Now onto people voting.

Obviously, on the 23rd June the UK has an EU Referendum to decide wether we stay or remain in the EU. Vote Leave want to ‘Leave’ the EU such as former London Mayor Boris Johnson and the Justice Security Michael Gove, and then the Stronger In campaigners want to remain in the EU, which include the PM David Cameron and The Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne. (click links for insights of each campaigns arguments)

Whether you agree or disagree with the campaigns, you need to make a decision yourself on whether to remain or leave, if you are eligible to do so. If you have registered, but are undecided or may not vote, you have time to do your research and let yourself decide what’s best for you. Don’t be scaremongered by the politics and look closer to home. If your life has been effected heavily by a migrant/immigrant, such as you’ve lost out on work, or a home because of one, maybe look to see what ‘Vote Leave’ says. If you already have a job and a good income, you may want to see what the ‘Stronger In’ side say, to see how the Economics behind leaving may effect you. It could mean you are worse off because of a potential rise in tax as the UK may leave the EU’s free trade market, but we’ll come onto the Negatives and Positives later.

If you are a sovereign person, you can argue ‘getting our country back’ as Nigel Farage states most of the time can reinstate sovereignty to the UK. However, ThePoliticsView argues that UK sovereignty will always exist either way for generations to come. Tea sipping, the Monarchy, Great British Bulldogs can and always will exist in a world that will hopefully not see another World War occur or the British Dying due to a freak disease only effecting UK citizens! In terms of voting, do what you feel is best and argue to yourself, ‘is life really that bad at the moment’? If the answer is no, then staying in the EU will not change your life as dramatically as leaving, and life will carry on as normal for years to come. If the answer is Yes, then perhaps a UK ‘Brexit’ can benefit you, but that all depends on things such as your economic state, your sovereign attitude and your willingness to accept potential economic failures/hardship and allowing people to come and live/work in the UK under certain rules.

       3. The Main Positives and Negatives of the EU. 

Enough of voting matters now, and onto the ‘Pros and Cons’ of the EU. The major positive supported by Britain Stronger in Europe Campaigners is the free trade market the UK accesses from it’s EU membership. This means trade around each of the 28 states is tariff/tax free, keeping prices low, VAT low and trading to become easier. It also allows people to come and offer their skills to improve the UK economy, filling both skilled jobs (like doctors, dentists ect) and laboured jobs (like builders, cleaners etc). However, this is also seen as a negative due to the free movement of people act as a rule of receiving free trade. This means any EU states citizen can live and work in another EU state almost without any restriction which causes over population and competition, especially in a place like the UK with all it’s benefits and growing economy. This is Vote Leaves main focus, because if we leave, they suggest the UK can control it’s boarders and limit the amount of people coming into the UK. On the other hand, David Cameron believes that if we stay, he has negotiated a ‘special status’ deal to make sure migrants have to get a job within a certain time period, speak english to working proficiency, not claim benefits right away and creditably offer something to the UK in four years or be ‘kicked out’.

One other thing to bare in mind is the Schengen Agreement. This means 26 of the 28 states (doesn’t include the UK or Ireland) ”allows for passport free travel through the 26 European states as participating countries have agreed not to impose border controls.” This makes it slightly harder for people to come into the UK and Ireland as they have to go through boarder checks to be allowed into the country. It’s a small act to consider as it allows the UK and Ireland to control it’s boarders better, potentially helping to stop fugitives and wanted terrorists to come freely into the UK or Ireland.

However, the main thing to take out of this, is the positive of free trade and the ‘sort of’ negative to the free movement of people. The free movement of people has been mostly made out to be negative thing because immigration/migration is the main focus of Vote Leave unlike Stronger In, who focus more on the Economic issues surrounding Brexit. 

        4. UK parties, where do they stand?

In terms of individual parties, The Conservatives are at a ’50/50′ of In and Outs due to split views of what’s best of the UK. (See links above for remain and leave arguments). The main In parties are firstly, Labour mainly because of the Workers Rights the EU offers. The Liberal Democrats because of various liberal ideas and ‘fairness’ EU laws give many people across the EU, such as the chance to live and work anywhere in the EU. The Greens because they feel the environment is a global matter to tackle and should be done with the alliances of other EU states. The SNP are the final major party to want remain due to the fact Scotland parliament wishes to remain in the EU.

Although these parties all want to remain, individual/groups of MP’s want to leave from each party also, who will work alongside essentially the entire UKIP party striving to fulfil their whole purpose. ‘Get our Country Back’. Other smaller parties like the BNP and Britain First are campaigning to leave based on similar, perhaps more facist views to the UKIP ideals.

      5. Has this helped? 

ThePoliticsView offers news and the chance for you to comment on political stories everyday, and we want to know if this helps you at all to decide where you stand on voting in the EU. We have tried to remain impartial as we can, by just stating facts and ideas from the campaigns and how it might effect you mostly when you go to cast your vote.

Please offer you insights on this blog in the comment section below and if you made it this far, thank you for reading this one off insight by ThePoliticsView! 

Brexit: Voice YOUR views on Vote Leave’s Campaign

Official Website: http://www.voteleavetakecontrol.org/

This specific blog aims to allow you to simply voice your views about the Eurosceptic Campaigners Vote Leave. Vote Leave are headed by individuals such as the Justice Minister Michael Gove (Conservatives), former London Mayor Boris Johnson MP (Conservatives) and a helping hand from UKIP leader and head of the defunct Grassroots Out Campaign Nigel Farage MEP. 

Vote Leave mainly argue the following key points as to why the UK should Leave the European Union.

  • Britain Pays £350 million every week to the EU which amounts to the cost of facilitating and building a new hospital.
  • They argue that Five new nations want to join the EU with a total up too 89 million potential new migrants and immigrants allowed to come to work and live in the UK. The nations are as follows: (Population in Brackets)
  1. Albania (2.8 million)
  2. Montenegro (600,000)
  3. Macedonia (2.1 million)
  4. Turkey (76 million)
  5. Serbia (7.2 million)
  • The EU overrules UK Laws: Vote Leave suggests that UK laws are ‘dictated’ by the EU that stops the British public being able to vote out the politicians who make european laws.
  • Vote Leave claim that the UK can still trade within the EU and tap into the european market just like Norway.
  • UK Sovereignty is lowered because Vote Leave argues the UK has lost its power and law making abilities to govern its own state.

These respective points outline the key arguments from the Vote Leave campaign, focusing on mainly the negatives of Immigration and decreased Sovereignty showing why the UK is better off outside the EU.

So what’s your view of the Brexit campaigning and are their arguments valid and solid enough to sway you to vote for them?

Comment Below YOUR views on Vote Leave and Brexit arguments.

ITV debate: Farage and Cameron face EU questions: The Overview

Source: BBC

Last night saw a Referendum ‘grilling’ from a live audience towards the Eurosceptic leave campaigner Nigel Farage and the Europhile remain campaigner, the Prime Minister David Cameron. 

During the TV debate, Nigel Farage has said he has been “demonised” for his views on immigration as he and David Cameron faced questions in a live EU TV debate.

The UKIP leader faced accusations of “inflammatory” scaremongering during exchanges with members of the public.

But he insisted there was wide support for “getting a grip” on migration, including from ethnic minority groups.

The PM David Cameron said there were “good and bad ways” to control immigration but warned against a “Little England” stance.

Mr Farage and Mr Cameron did not debate head-to-head but appeared in turn on the ITV referendum special – hosted by Julie Etchingham – each facing half-an-hour of questions on the economy, immigration, security and sovereignty from the 200-strong audience.

So, what did they argue?

Nigel Farage 

According to the BBC, UKIP leader Nigel Farage, who was making the case for the UK to leave the EU, argued the 28-member union was “done for” economically and that even if UK firms had tariffs imposed on them after leaving, this would cost less than the amount the UK was currently giving to Brussels.

“No deal is better than the rotten deal that we have at the moment,” he said.

Furthermore, he pressed on the Leave campaign’s plans to stop EU migrants having the automatic right to live and work in the UK, Mr Farage said he accepted that migrants did make a contribution to the UK economy but “the real truth is that there is more to life than GDP” and the reality was that “ordinary decent Britons” had had “a rotten time” in recent years.

David Cameron

The BBC quote that when addressing the same audience, Mr Cameron outlined he was ‘frustrated’ by the EU, but this was not a justification for walking away, saying he wanted to lead a country that was a “fighter not a quitter”.

“The right thing to do is to fight for a great Britain in the EU and not take the Little England option of Nigel Farage,” he said.

He argued there was a growing consensus that a vote to leave the UK would “put jobs at risk and shrink the economy”, criticising Mr Farage for downplaying the economic arguments.

“GDP is the size of our economy. It is the combination of all the wealth our country creates. He (Farage) is basically saying it doesn’t really matter. He is so keen to get us out of Europe that he is prepared to sacrifice jobs and growth along the way.”

What’s YOUR view of the debate and the respective arguments?

Who was stronger during the live ITV debate? Who’s arguments were more encouraging for the UK to vote for? Who is leading in the Referendum race in your view, Remain or Leave?

Comment below your views on the debate and general Referendum arguments

The UK’s EU referendum: Facts, Figures and all you need to know

Source: BBC, YouGov

Are you confused about the UK’s European Union membership and the upcoming referendum?

This blog will hopefully help you to learn more about the UK and EU relations ahead of the 23rd June Referendum…

Should the United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union or leave the European Union? This is the ultimate question of the referendum where you either vote yes or no as to what the UK should do in your opinion.

When is it happening?

23rd June 2016 in the UK.

Where/How do I vote?

Register to vote here at https://www.gov.uk/register-to-vote as soon as possible. You can register to vote firstly as a polling vote, where you vote yourself at a local polling station. Secondly, you can vote via a postal vote where you send your vote by letter to a local council or polling station. you can lastly vote by proxy, where you can register someone to vote on your behalf (if you give a valid reason why they are voting for you).

Who will be able to vote?

British, Irish and Commonwealth citizens over 18 who are resident in the UK, along with UK nationals living abroad who have been on the electoral register in the UK in the past 15 years. Members of the House of Lords and Commonwealth citizens in Gibraltar will also be eligible, unlike in a general election. Citizens from EU countries – apart from Ireland, Malta and Cyprus – will not get a vote. (BBC article at the top)

What is a referendum?

A referendum is basically a vote in which everyone (or nearly everyone) of voting age can take part, normally giving a “Yes” or “No” answer to a question. Whichever side gets more than half of all votes cast is considered to have won. (BBC article)

Who wants the UK to leave the EU?

Vote Leave are the campaigners to exit the EU.

The British public are fairly evenly split, according to the latest opinion polls. The UK Independence Party lead by Nigel Farage, which won the last European elections, and received nearly four million votes – 13% of those cast – in May’s general election, campaigns for Britain’s exit from the EU. About half of Conservative MPs, including five cabinet ministers, several Labour MPs and the DUP are also in favour of leaving. (BBC)

Who wants the UK to stay in the EU?

Britain Stronger in Europe are the campaigners to remain in the EU.

Prime Minister David Cameron wants Britain to stay in the EU, now he has got some powers back from it. Sixteen members of his cabinet also back staying in. The Conservative Party has pledged to be neutral in the campaign – but the Labour Party, SNP, Plaid Cymru and the Lib Dems are all in favour of staying in. US president Barack Obama also wants Britain to remain in the EU, as do other EU nations such as France and Germany. (BBC)

So far, the British public seems pretty evenly split on the issue with people aged 18-25 more likely to vote in, while people aged 60 and over more likely to vote out.

So would Britain be better in or out?

It depends which way you look at it – or what you believe is important. Leaving the EU would be a big step – arguably far more important than who wins a general election – but would it set the nation free or condemn it to economic ruin? Here is a rundown of the arguments for and against. (BBC)

What do you make of the EU Referendum?

Should we remain in the EU or exit? why do you believe we should remain? Why do you believe we should exit?

Comment below your views and questions 

EU Referendum: Boris Johnson compares EU’s aims to Hitler’s

Source: BBC

In a recent BBC article, the leading Vote Leave campaigner Boris Johnson has come out and compared the EU’s aims to Hitler’s, saying ”both involved the intention to unify Europe under a single ‘authority’.”

Furthermore, the pro-Brexit Tory MP said both the Nazi leader and Napoleon had ”failed at unification” and the EU was an ”attempt to do this by different methods”.

Labour MP Yvette Cooper, from the Remain campaign, accused the ex-London Mayor of playing “nasty, nasty games”.

Meanwhile, UKIP leader Nigel Farage has backed Mr Johnson to be the next Prime Minister.

What’s your views of Boris Johnson’s remarks? 

Is this a fairly valid comparison? or is this judgement completely ludicrous and uncalled for in the vote leaves campaigning? How do you feel other remain campaigners will respond to this?

Comment below your views on Boris Johnson’s EU/Hitler remarks  

Lead EU referendum campaigns named

Source: BBC

This short blog emphasises briefly the two main campaign’s named in the upcoming european referendum for both the In and the Out Campaigners.

For the In campaign, the Britain Stronger in Europe group will lead this campaign to stay in the EU, which includes leading politicians PM David Cameron and Chancellor of the exchequer George Osborne.

On the other hand, the Vote Leave group will lead the Out campaign to exit the EU, including lead politicians such as Boris Johnson and Michael Gove.

According to the BBC, ”Vote Leave saw off a challenge from a rival campaign Grassroots Out, backed by UKIP leader Nigel Farage.”

Furthermore, ”The campaigns will be allowed to spend up to £7m, get a free mail-shot, TV broadcasts and £600,000 public funds.”

In your view, who do you think will win the campaigning for the EU Referendum? Simply asked, will we remain in the EU, or out? Who do you think is the stronger campaign group?

Comment below your views in the comment section below