Donald Trump: Elected, Inaugurated and now officially President of the United States of America

Months ago, not only was this blog put on hold, but Donald Trump was seen as an outsider in the race to become the United States new President.

Low and behold on November 8th, he officially defeated the Democrat Party Nominee, Hilary clinton by 306 Electoral votes, to her 232, surpassing beyond the 270 limit needed to win the presidency. He notably won a number of key swing states like Florida, including the historic safe Republican seats such as Texas.

Today, his inauguration has inspired this blog to reinvigorate itself into a more detailed, personal outlook on political stories that will discuss, assess and expand upon recent political news. It will continue to allow readers to expand there views on respective stories also.

But why has this story inspired ThePoliticsView to come back?

If there was ever a political story to discuss on a site like this, that would indeed be this story and the story of Brexit – which if you search for on this site, you will find.

Trump has said that he will ‘make America great again’. A constant slogan used for the masses to relate to. A little like ‘we want our country back’ used from Vote Leave campaigners in the UK wanting an exit from the European Union. It is a short, punchy line that states exactly what people want.

But can Trump really make America great again?

Outgoing Democrat President, Barack Obama has been a heavy critic of Trump, not only because of him being ‘Republican’, but also due to the societal stirs and hate he has spawned over the past several months.

He’s repeatedly been called, or defined as a Xenophobic, Racist, Prejudice, Misogynist, a Dictator and a Narcissist whom believes the Environmental damages we face is a myth ‘created by the Chinese, to make US manufacturing non-competitive’ . In fact, he even tweeted that one (Source).

Now, ThePoliticsView may be giving off a negative output onto Mr Trump here, but he is only to blame for why he’s been negatively portrayed as the man he is. It’s because he is who he is made out to be at the end of the day, and thats hard not to deny after all of the public outbursts and statements Donald Trump has made.

Although he may make America ‘great again’ (which I personally think degrades all of the work Obama has done over the last 8 years to say it wasn’t ‘great’), he faces a lot of social backlash and walls to re-build, not only along the boarder of Mexico, but within the sphere of society and with the people of America that he wishes to ‘bring together’.

Trump is a critic of certain trade agreements too, such as the North Atlantic Trade Organisation (NATO) and trading ties in South America. This is a warning to expect the unexpected under Trump. He is almost if you like, a ‘loose cannon’ who is hard to predict exactly what he want’s to do, or if he’ll do it at all.

One things for sure and that’s time will be very different to the past 8 years under Obama, and things are going to change, be it Trade deals, Immigration, Globalisation norms or Military Agenda’s both in America and Globally.

So, this is where you come into it:

Do you think Donald Trump can ‘make America great again?’

Do you think he’ll keep to his word on hard policies, such as building the great Mexican wall?

Comment below what you make of Donald Trumps Presidency inauguration and what you think he’ll do as president.

September & Early October Overview of all the main Political Stories

ThePoliticsView has had a short hiatus during the months of September and October. The reasons being the editor took time off to amend personal matters.

This blog should provide an overview of the main political stories that have occurred since the last published article, when Diane James was appointed the new UKIP leader back in early September.

Speaking of which, she has ended up stepping down from the UKIP leadership role just 18 days after being elected. She reportedly felt hard done by as leader, meaning she couldn’t coney her opinions freely within the party. Nigel Farage has stood in as temporary leader until a new leader is elected over the coming weeks.

The favourite Steven Woolfe has recently been out into hospital after a psychical altercation with another party MEP in Strasbourg. An investigation is now underway to deal with the issue, but Mr Woolfe has now been sent home from the hospital and is recovering well. He’s still considering running for UKIP leadership status as well as MEP Bill Etheridge who came 3rd behind Lisa Duffy and Diane James respectively in the last UKIP leadership election.

Theresa May and her new UK government have solidified the promised Brexit outcome from June’s referendum result by announcing article 50 will be triggered by early next March in 2017. All parties held their respective conferences over the past few months, and during the Conservative’s conference, she outlined her plans for brexit to occur and negotiations will continue to proceed towards structuring the UK’s plans for leaving the EU.

She also states that MP’s will not have a vote on the Tory’s outlined plans for triggering Article 50, and it will go ahead under the Conservatives ideals. This however, only means the negotiations will not be affected by MP’s, but they may have the final say upon the ‘final’ deal in place before the UK triggers article 50. More to come on that.

Jeremy Corbyn has retained his spot as Labour leader after beating his fellow competitor Owen Smith, winning just over 60% of the vote (61.8%). He has also since re-shaped Labours shadow cabinet and he wants to be a pivotal part of the brexit negotiations, as well as challenging the tories in the 2020 general election.

Finally, the last ‘major story’ over the past few weeks delves into the American Presidential race between Republican candidate Donald Trump and Democrat candidate Hilary Clinton. They have held the first few hustings, gaining millions of viewers worldwide, which have provided some interesting outcomes.

It’s reported that neither of them are winning outright in each hustings, but many feel Hilary Clinton is just edging them slightly over her rival Trump. Trump hasn’t been short of controversy in his debating skills, bringing up sexism, racism and prejudism into the fray through is ‘normalised’ bigoted views. Hilary herself has also been scrutinised for her deleted emails, ill well-being and behind the scenes issues by Trump, so both candidates are under heavy fire whilst trying to become president. The polls still have them neck and neck come November 8th (the date of the election) so more to come on that in the next few weeks.

What do you make of these major political stories over the past few weeks?

Is UKIP going to recover soon? Who will be their new leader? Will brexit be a success? Has Theresa May shown enough ambition fro Britain? Will Jeremy Corbyn be a success as Labour leader? Can they compete with the tories in 2020? Who do you think will be the next American President and why?

Comment below your views on any of the respective stories below

Diane James is named as UKIP’s new Party Leader

SOURCE: BBC

The Greens have named Caroline Lucas and Jonathan Bartley as their co-leaders, Labour will announce there’s soon and now UKIP have named Diane James as their newly elected Party Leader.

UK politics has officially been ‘re-designed’ post voting to exit from the EU, with a completely new direction as to where the UK goes and how it’s governed.

The news of Diane James’ victory for UKIP leadership came yesterday at UKIP’s party conference yesterday.

Below outlines the results:

Diane James 8,451
Lisa Duffy 4,591
Bill Etheridge 2,052
Phillip Broughton 1,544
Elizabeth Jones 1,203

Source: BBC 2016

New leader Diane James, a prominent Vote Leave campaigner,  stated in her opening speech that the Prime Minster Theresa May has to “get on with getting the UK out of the EU”.

Ms James had been strongly regarded as the favourite to succeed Nigel Farage, who has quit as it’s leader following the UK’s vote to leave the EU. He feels that his ‘job is done’ and he has ‘given his all to the party’.

MEP Ms James, won with 8,451 votes, ahead of Lisa Duffy in 2nd, who received 4,591.

She said UKIP was “the opposition party in waiting” and said the Tories “cannot be trusted with true Brexit”.

“The threats to the referendum outcome are increasing by the day,” she said, adding she would reject “Brexit-lite”.

UKIP is known to now be the ‘face of UK Euroscepticism’ for nearly two decades. Mr Farage bows out by helping turn UKIP from a fringe party, into one of the biggest parties in UK politics – in terms of votes at the 2015 general election. He also independently helped towards persuading more than 17 million people to vote to leave the EU.

Ms James further said that UKIP had “moved mountains on the political landscape” and was the “change movement of the United Kingdom”.  She quotes: “I believe in UKIP’s values of liberty, common sense, democracy and pragmatic approaches to the challenges this country faces.”

She ended by telling the party conference that she might use ‘different language’ and be ‘less frank’ than Mr Farage, but she would be honest and “uphold all the beliefs and values that this party stands for”.

When directing this at the Prime Minister, she said: “If you’re watching this afternoon, you’ll be watching the opposition party in waiting.”

What do you make of UKIP’s newly elected leader Diane James?

Will she hold the government into account for Brexit? Will she be a good leader for UKIP? What will she put onto the table for UK politics in the ear of Article 50 and Brexit?

Comment your views on Diane James and UKIP below 

Labour leadership hopeful Owen Smith: “Only one MP should challenge Corbyn”

SOURCE: BBC

It was announced recently that Labour MP Owen Smith is to join the race for Labour leadership. Just day’s after he announced he was going to run for the lead-opposition party role as head of Labour, he now wants just two MP’s in the running for the lead seat.

Owen Smith has further said there was a ‘widespread view’ among MPs that there should only be one challenger, but that he was not sure how they should be chosen.

He suggested the party’s deputy leader, MPs or executive committee could choose between him and Angela Eagle to challenge Mr Corbyn.

Angela Eagle, who has already secured 51 nominations from MPs, announced she was running for the Labour leadership last week. 

The leadership contest is under way due too most Labour MPs signing a vote of no confidence in Mr Corbyn, after his questioned EU Referendum campaigning. Mr Corbyn has rejected their calls to stand down and won a battle to be automatically included on the ballot to be put to members.

His candidacy has sparked fears among Mr Corbyn’s critics that he could split the vote from members opposed to the leader.

Mr Smith told Sunday Politics: “I think there’s a widespread view in the parliamentary Labour Party, and indeed amongst many of the members, that probably there should only be one challenger.”

When asked how that challenger should be determined, he said: “I’m not sure yet. I think it’s not really for me to determine how we get there as one of the challengers, but I am prepared to submit to whatever mechanism – whether it’s the deputy leader of the party, or the parliamentary leadership of the party, or the NEC (National Executive Committee) come up with, or the PLP itself.”

Mr Smith also repeated his call for a second EU referendum, claiming voters had been ‘sold a pup’ by the Leave campaign. He said the poll should be held once the terms of the UK’s Brexit negotiations are clear.

What’s your views on Owen Smiths offering to become the new Labour leader?

Will he do a good job? Is he a stronger candidate than Angela Eagle? Will Corbyn prevail and win against the ‘rebels’ to retain his seat? Will this hit labour hard, considering all of the inner-party conflict?

Comment below YOUR views on Jeremy Corbyn, Angela Eagle, Owen Smith and the Labour leadership race

Does there have to be a second Referendum?

SOURCE: BBC

The claim is that a referendum lock that was introduced by the coalition government in 2011, means that there will have to be a second referendum before the UK leaves the EU.

However, a BBC article states a reality check into this claim, saying it’s ”far from clear that there’s any legal requirement for a second referendum and, even if there were, the referendum lock could be repealed.”

The BBC state’s:

”The European Union Act 2011, passed by the coalition government, created a so-called “referendum lock”. Its purpose was to create a legal requirement to hold a referendum if any proposal were made to transfer further powers from the UK to the EU.”

”However, because of the way the Act is worded, some people have argued that it could be used to force a second referendum before the UK leaves the EU. It says that any new treaty that amends or replaces one of the existing primary EU treaties should be subject to a referendum before it can be ratified.”

So if it was subsequently the case that the 2011 act had created a requirement for a second referendum, it could be avoided anyway despite this, by simply repealing the act. It would mean having to see both Houses of Parliament agreeing to overturn the existing law. But it wouldn’t necessarily be particularly difficult.

Ultimately, as long as the government and Parliament are still agreeing that the referendum result should be enacted and accepted on behalf of the democratic vote, it’s hard to see any sort of legal obstacle occur that would be insuperable to the referendum result. Ultimately, Parliament makes the laws and has emphasised that its mostly in favour of what the outcome was, a vote to leave the European Union by 3.8%.

What do you make of calls for a 2nd Referendum?

Will it be legally simple to try to get another referendum going? Because its reported that people are regretting their decision to leave, can this sway parliament to think twice about accepting the democratic vote? Will the UK be better off outside the EU eventually?

Comment below YOUR views on the EU Referendum outcome and calls for a 2nd referendum 

Conservative Leadership: Theresa May and Andrea Leadsman go head to head

SOURCE: BBC

Today, the conservative MPs have voted for Theresa May and Andrea Leadsom to become the new Conservative Party Leader, thus new Prime minister of the UK.

They will go head to head to become the next leader of the Conservative Party, after Michael Gove was eliminated from the contest.

Results

After the second MPs’ ballot, Home Secretary Mrs May finished with 199 votes, Energy Minister Mrs Leadsom 84 and the Justice Secretary Mr Gove, finished with 46.

The new tory leader will be announced after campaigning on September 9th, with Theresa May going into it strong with a clear 115 point victory over 2nd placed Andrea Leadsom.

It all came about when the current Prime Minister David Cameron resigned after finishing on the ‘losing side’ in the UK’s EU referendum, in which the UK voted to leave by a margin of 3.8%.

The results were announced at Westminster by Conservative MP Graham Brady, the chairman of the backbench 1922 Committee.

There had originally been five contenders to succeed Mr Cameron, with MPs voting in two rounds to get that number down to two.

The contest now moves to its final stage with the Conservative Party’s 150,000-strong membership deciding between Mrs May, a Remain campaigner with a long track record in government, and Mrs Leadsom, a leading light of the Brexit campaign who has stressed her City and business background.

Those that want to vote and are eligible has to have been a member of the Conservative Party by 9 June.

Polling expert Professor John Curtice, of Strathclyde University, said the electorate for the contest represented a “very distinctive slice of Britain”.

They would be mostly over 50, disproportionately male, and “overwhelmingly middle class”, he said.

He predicted the Brexit debate would “play a role” in the contest, but not a defining one.

Both candidates have been linked to euroscepticism, so could be the best choices on offer.

What do you make of the Tory leadership race? Are the right two in place to become the next UK and tory leader? Should another candidate still be in the race? Who will go on to become the new Prime Minister and why?

Comment below YOUR views of the conservative leadership race 

Nigel Farage stands down as UKIP Leader

SOURCE: BBC

The nationalist UKIP leader Nigel Farage is one of many contributors (perhaps of the more controversial contributors) over the years to campaign for UK independence from the EU. After just a few weeks after the EU Referendum outcome which saw the UK exit from the EU, Nigel Farage has today stood down from his UKIP leadership role. 

In his speech, Mr Farage said his “political ambition has been achieved” with the UK having voted to leave the EU.

The BBC have quoted to say Farage outlined the party was in a “pretty good place” and said he would not change his mind about quitting as he did after the 2015 general election.

Furthermore, he said leading UKIP was “tough at times” but “all worth it” said Mr Farage, who is also an MEP. He added that the UK needed a “Brexit prime minister”.

Mr Farage said the party would campaign against “backsliding” on the UK’s exit from the EU, saying he planned to see out his term in the European Parliament – describing his party as “the turkeys that voted for Christmas”.

He said his party’s “greatest potential” lay in attracting Labour voters. He will not be backing any particular candidate to replace him.

Deputy Leader Paul Nuttall and Douglas Carswell MP are favourites to take over the UKIP leadership role.

Mr Farage finished by announcing his decision to stand aside in a speech in London, saying: “I want my life back, and it begins right now.”

He has been leader of UKIP for most of the past eight years, standing down briefly in 2009 and being re-elected the following year.

What are your views on Nigel Farage?

Did he serve UKIP well? Was his Referendum campaigning fair? Who will take over him as UKIP Leader?

Comment below your views on Nigel Farage and UKIP below

Brexit: What happens now the UK has voted for Independence from the EU?

Source: BBC

As is now known, the UK has voted to leave the EU – and has formulated a process that has come to be known as Brexit. Here is what is likely to happen next over the next few years.

  • A New Prime Minister is Needed Imminently:

As announced in a statement outside Downing Street, David Cameron has said the government would respect the result and carry out the instructions of the British people, reassuring the 2.9 million EU citizens in the UK that they will not be adversely affected.

Although his responsibility was to remain in No 10 to “steady the ship”, he announced he would step down in the autumn as he was not the right “captain to steer the country to its next destination”.

A new Conservative leader and prime minister is expected to be elected by 9 September.

Its widely reported that the Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has come under huge pressure from within his own party to consider his position, however he has insisted he will not step down.

Labour MPs have passed a motion of no confidence in Mr Corbyn, mainly due to there opinion of his weak leadership during the referendum campaign. As stated in the linked article above by ThePoliticsView, he is trying to fill gaps in his shadow cabinet following a wave of resignations.

Please note, this is not a formal mechanism for removing Mr Corbyn and he could survive even if the vote, should it take place, went against him.

  • Steady the Markets:

Market reaction to the referendum result was immediate and dramatic.

The BBC have announced that the FTSE 100 index of leading shares fell 8% after opening in London on Friday. Furthermore, there was a big sell-off of bank shares and house builders, with Barclays and RBS at one point down by more than 30%. By the end of trading, the index had bounced back, closing 2.8% down. The FTSE 250 index closed down 7% on Friday.

The value of the pound has also been hit hard on the foreign exchange markets, tumbling to lows not seen since 1985. At one stage, it hit $1.3305, a fall of more than 10%, although it too slightly recovered to close down 9% at $1.36.

The BBC have also written that the Chancellor George Osborne ”made a statement before the UK stock market opened on Monday in a bid to calm the markets. He said the UK was ready to face the future “from a position of strength” and indicated there would be no immediate emergency Budget.”

  • See how the EU leaders respond:

All EU leaders wanted the UK to stay in the bloc and a Leave vote has been met with disappointment and dismay across the Channel.

The BBC have said that ”hastily-convened meetings are taking place in Brussels and across foreign capitals on how to deal with the fallout of the UK’s decision, with the leaders of Germany, France and Italy meeting on Monday ahead of a wider EU summit later this week.”

European Council President Donald Tusk has appealed for unity among the EU’s 27 other members, saying the vote is historic but “not a moment for hysterical reactions”. German leader Angela Merkel said the vote was “regrettable” and a “watershed moment” for the EU.

  • Trigger Article 50:

There is a formal legal process for withdrawing from the EU – enshrined in Article 50 of the 2009 Lisbon Treaty – although it has never been invoked before.

Mr Cameron has said it should be up to his successor to decide when to activate Article 50 by notifying the European Council. Once this happens, the UK is cut out of EU decision-making at the highest level and there will be no way back unless by unanimous consent from all other member states.

Parliament and the BBC have said that ”quitting the EU is not an automatic process – it has to be negotiated with the remaining 27 members and ultimately approved by them by qualified majority.”

Leave campaigners such as Boris Johnson and Michael Gove have said there ”is no need to trigger Article 50 immediately, suggesting that first there should be a period of informal discussions with other EU members and the European Commission to iron out the main issues and a feasible timetable.”

  • Negotiate the UK’s Exit:

The main certain  question at the moment is who will do the negotiating for Britain? Who is strong enough to trigger article 50?

It’s good to consider that most of the senior members of the government – such as David Cameron, Chancellor George Osborne, Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond and Home Secretary Theresa May – are all Remain supporters and some of them may choose to depart when the PM stands down.

The BBC have said that during the campaign, the Leave side are ”happy for existing ministers and senior civil servants – including cabinet secretary Sir Jeremy Heywood – to lead the negotiations although they would expect senior Leave figures to play a very prominent role, as well as figures from other parties, business, law and civil society.”

Now, however, it seems certain the next prime minister – whoever they may be – will take charge of the process.

  •  Stable an unsettled Parliament:

The last process of extricating the UK from the EU, will ultimately involve rescinding the 1972 European Communities Act, the brief piece of legislation that brought the country into the European Economic Community, as it was then known, and which gives primacy to EU law in the UK.

It will also mean sifting through an estimated 80,000 pages of EU agreements, which have been enacted over the past five decades, to decide which will be repealed, amended or retained – a process which Parliament will want to oversee.

Parliament will ultimately have to ratify the treaty authorising UK withdrawal. Its good to consider that the majority of the UK’s 650 MPs were in favour of Britain staying in the EU and while they will have to respect the will of the British people, they will not be silent bystanders. This is where Brexit may be denied and stopped against the democracy of the UK. 

What do you make of Brexit? Will the UK be strong by the end of the process? Will the UK negotiate good deals and if so, under who? Will Brexit occur if parliaments MPs reject it?

Comment below YOUR views on Brexit and how the UK can be stronger outside the EU under a new leadership. 

Candidates for Conservative party leadership: Who might succeed David Cameron?

Source: BBCBBC, The Guardian

Prime Minister David Cameron has announced he intends to stand down as Conservative Party leader and prime minister following the UK’s decision to leave the EU. The BBC reports that he says his successor should be elected by the time of the party’s conference in October.

So what are the rules and who are the leading candidates?

Rules involved

According the the Conservative party and the BBC, The party’s 1922 committee will oversee the contest. Its executive has suggested the contest should follow the system used to elect David Cameron in 2005, which would see MPs pick two candidates to put to the wider membership.

Furthermore, MPs wanting to stand need to be nominated by two others to get onto the ballot paper. If there are three or more candidates, a ballot or series of ballots will be held of all the party’s 331 MPs to whittle down the field to two. In each round, the candidate with the fewest votes will be eliminated.

After that, a vote of the wider party – in which all Conservative members will have a say – will be held to choose the winner, with hustings taking place.

New party leader in stages:

Stage 1 see’s 3 or more candidates broken down via a collect conservative MP ballot vote. Stage 2 see’s the two highest voted in candidates go head to head and they are elected via another ballot vote between choosing between the two via MPs and wider tory members. Stage 3 see’s these ballots counted and an overall leader elected whoever scores more votes.

Candidates on Offer (BBC 2016) 

  • Boris Johnson (Vote Leave)

The former mayor of London was immediately installed as the bookies’ favourite to be the next occupant of Downing Street – but he’s since been overtaken by Theresa May. As a pro eurosceptic and Vote Leave leader, he seems to have the most obvious CV for the role.

  • Theresa May (Stronger In)

One of the longest-serving home secretaries in history has long been mentioned as a potential future leader of the party and Mrs May is one of Whitehall’s toughest and shrewdest operators. In the fallow years after the Conservatives’ 1997 landslide defeat, she famously said the party was referred to by some as the “nasty party”.

  • Steven Crabb (Stronger In)

A rising star of the Conservative Party, and the first Conservative cabinet minister for generations to sport a beard, the 43-year-old has launched a leadership bid on a joint ticket with Business Secretary Sajid Javid.

  • John Barron (Vote Leave)

Mr Baron says he has been asked to consider running for Tory leader and is taking soundings.

Mr Barron, 52, was also ”instrumental in pushing the Conservative leadership into committing to the referendum, with a letter to the prime minister, signed by more than 100 MPs, followed by a rebel amendment to the 2013 Queen’s Speech.”

  • Dr Liam Fox (Vote Leave)

The former defence secretary, 54, is expected to throw his hat in to the ring for a second time. Mr Fox, a former GP, came a close third in the 2005 leadership contest which saw David Cameron emerge as the victor.

  • Jeremy Hunt (Stronger In)

The controversial health secretary, who joined Parliament in 2005 and is politically close to David Cameron, has said he is “seriously considering” running for the leadership of the Conservative Party.

The 49-year-old has previously said he expected the health brief “to be my last big job in politics” but has since said: “I said it might be… things change in politics very, very rapidly.”

  • Nicky Morgan (Stronger In)

The education secretary has said she is “actively considering” whether to throw her hat into the ring, saying it would “be good” to have a woman in the final two on the ballot paper.

However, her being on the centre-left of the party, her strong support for a Remain vote may put her at a disadvantage.

  • Michael Gove (Vote Leave)

Unlike Mr Johnson, the 48-year-old has gone out of his way in the past to put a limit on his personal ambitions, even going so far as to suggest that he was not equipped to do the job of prime minister.

The former Times journalist, who entered Parliament in 2005, has been a close personal friend of David Cameron and George Osborne and was a key figure in the party’s modernisation that led to its return to power in 2010. As another pro Vote Leave campaigner, he is another highly potential candidate if he puts himself forward.

Meanwhile, George Osborne has ruled himself out of the race to be party leader and is keen to remain as Chancellor of the Exchequer.

It’s believed that all of the prospective contenders are gauging support within the parliamentary party, which will whittle down the candidates to two in a series of ballots before Conservative party members decide between them. The final result is expected on 9 September.

So what do you make of the Tory party leadership race? Who will come out on top and be voted in as the new Prime Minister and Conservative Leader? How well do you think Cameron applied himself as Prime minister and Tory party leader?

Comment Below YOUR views of the Conservative leadership race and David Cameron as PM.

ThePoliticsView on The EU Referendum: Overview, facts and a helpful insight

This is a personal blog into the EU Referendum by ThePoliticsView on the EU Referendum. This shall remain impartial, but strong views my be expressed in the process.

  1. What do we know about the EU? What does it do?

This should help explain each part of the EU and how Laws are made throughout it… It is run by the European Council which is effectively the head Government of each state inside the European Union. There are 28 states in the EU, so there are 28 head of states representing it. The UK’s head of Council is currently the Prime Minister David Cameron, who helps to negotiate the general direction in how EU laws are scrutinised and legislated.

The next part of the EU construct is the European Commission headed by Jean-Claude Juncker, who are nominated members selected by each head of state and the UK’s is currently Lord Hill, who was respectfully nominated by the PM David Cameron to represent the UK in the Commission. There are 28 Commissioners as each head of the 28 states elects one each. EU Commissioners effectively help to propose and come up with laws that follows the directions of the Councils ideas. Furthermore, these laws made by the Commissioners are passed down to the European Parliament. 

This part of the EU are elected members by each of the states citizens in European Elections held every four to five years by EU states. There are a total of 751 MEP’s elected across all nations in the EU, where 73 come from the UK.  MEP’s from the UK are elected regionally, which include conservative Ashley Fox from the South west, UKIP leader Nigel Farage from the South East to the SNP member Ian Hudghton up in Scotland. These members of the EU help to scrutinise and amend policies and laws given by the Commissioners which is what makes the EU more democratic.

These Laws are then passed down finally onto the Councils of the European Union, who are different sub-groups of the EU who help to put final amendments onto proposed laws from the powers above. For example, if a law was associated with Climate Change, the officials of each EU state associated with environmental matters would help to put their expertise on hand to finalise the the laws being made. Once each four of these EU categories can conclude and vote in favour of the laws proposed, they are made Law by Brussels power-heads and legislated into laws all states abide too.

Along the way, the EU court of Justice will make sure that law making is made fairly and suited to the cause. The European Central Bank helps to look after the economies of each state that acquire the Euro to make sure everyone is working well financially. The UK is excluded as they have the Pound and run their own system through home banking. Finally, the EU Court of Auditors makes sure that the EU states spend their money correctly to stop economic crises occurring such as a recession.

That was a LOT to take in right?! Although that was a rhetorical question, feel free to comment your views about ThePoliticsView of how the EU is run below.

2. Now onto people voting.

Obviously, on the 23rd June the UK has an EU Referendum to decide wether we stay or remain in the EU. Vote Leave want to ‘Leave’ the EU such as former London Mayor Boris Johnson and the Justice Security Michael Gove, and then the Stronger In campaigners want to remain in the EU, which include the PM David Cameron and The Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne. (click links for insights of each campaigns arguments)

Whether you agree or disagree with the campaigns, you need to make a decision yourself on whether to remain or leave, if you are eligible to do so. If you have registered, but are undecided or may not vote, you have time to do your research and let yourself decide what’s best for you. Don’t be scaremongered by the politics and look closer to home. If your life has been effected heavily by a migrant/immigrant, such as you’ve lost out on work, or a home because of one, maybe look to see what ‘Vote Leave’ says. If you already have a job and a good income, you may want to see what the ‘Stronger In’ side say, to see how the Economics behind leaving may effect you. It could mean you are worse off because of a potential rise in tax as the UK may leave the EU’s free trade market, but we’ll come onto the Negatives and Positives later.

If you are a sovereign person, you can argue ‘getting our country back’ as Nigel Farage states most of the time can reinstate sovereignty to the UK. However, ThePoliticsView argues that UK sovereignty will always exist either way for generations to come. Tea sipping, the Monarchy, Great British Bulldogs can and always will exist in a world that will hopefully not see another World War occur or the British Dying due to a freak disease only effecting UK citizens! In terms of voting, do what you feel is best and argue to yourself, ‘is life really that bad at the moment’? If the answer is no, then staying in the EU will not change your life as dramatically as leaving, and life will carry on as normal for years to come. If the answer is Yes, then perhaps a UK ‘Brexit’ can benefit you, but that all depends on things such as your economic state, your sovereign attitude and your willingness to accept potential economic failures/hardship and allowing people to come and live/work in the UK under certain rules.

       3. The Main Positives and Negatives of the EU. 

Enough of voting matters now, and onto the ‘Pros and Cons’ of the EU. The major positive supported by Britain Stronger in Europe Campaigners is the free trade market the UK accesses from it’s EU membership. This means trade around each of the 28 states is tariff/tax free, keeping prices low, VAT low and trading to become easier. It also allows people to come and offer their skills to improve the UK economy, filling both skilled jobs (like doctors, dentists ect) and laboured jobs (like builders, cleaners etc). However, this is also seen as a negative due to the free movement of people act as a rule of receiving free trade. This means any EU states citizen can live and work in another EU state almost without any restriction which causes over population and competition, especially in a place like the UK with all it’s benefits and growing economy. This is Vote Leaves main focus, because if we leave, they suggest the UK can control it’s boarders and limit the amount of people coming into the UK. On the other hand, David Cameron believes that if we stay, he has negotiated a ‘special status’ deal to make sure migrants have to get a job within a certain time period, speak english to working proficiency, not claim benefits right away and creditably offer something to the UK in four years or be ‘kicked out’.

One other thing to bare in mind is the Schengen Agreement. This means 26 of the 28 states (doesn’t include the UK or Ireland) ”allows for passport free travel through the 26 European states as participating countries have agreed not to impose border controls.” This makes it slightly harder for people to come into the UK and Ireland as they have to go through boarder checks to be allowed into the country. It’s a small act to consider as it allows the UK and Ireland to control it’s boarders better, potentially helping to stop fugitives and wanted terrorists to come freely into the UK or Ireland.

However, the main thing to take out of this, is the positive of free trade and the ‘sort of’ negative to the free movement of people. The free movement of people has been mostly made out to be negative thing because immigration/migration is the main focus of Vote Leave unlike Stronger In, who focus more on the Economic issues surrounding Brexit. 

        4. UK parties, where do they stand?

In terms of individual parties, The Conservatives are at a ’50/50′ of In and Outs due to split views of what’s best of the UK. (See links above for remain and leave arguments). The main In parties are firstly, Labour mainly because of the Workers Rights the EU offers. The Liberal Democrats because of various liberal ideas and ‘fairness’ EU laws give many people across the EU, such as the chance to live and work anywhere in the EU. The Greens because they feel the environment is a global matter to tackle and should be done with the alliances of other EU states. The SNP are the final major party to want remain due to the fact Scotland parliament wishes to remain in the EU.

Although these parties all want to remain, individual/groups of MP’s want to leave from each party also, who will work alongside essentially the entire UKIP party striving to fulfil their whole purpose. ‘Get our Country Back’. Other smaller parties like the BNP and Britain First are campaigning to leave based on similar, perhaps more facist views to the UKIP ideals.

      5. Has this helped? 

ThePoliticsView offers news and the chance for you to comment on political stories everyday, and we want to know if this helps you at all to decide where you stand on voting in the EU. We have tried to remain impartial as we can, by just stating facts and ideas from the campaigns and how it might effect you mostly when you go to cast your vote.

Please offer you insights on this blog in the comment section below and if you made it this far, thank you for reading this one off insight by ThePoliticsView!