Brexit Report: Article 50 will be triggered and the UK will leave the single market

SOURCES: BBC

Back in October, ThePoliticsView published an article outlining most of the major political news that occurred in September and October 2016. 

In terms of the UK perspective, it outlined how former UKIP leader Diane James had resigned, triggering a new leadership election for the party to occur. It turns out the new leader voted in was Paul Nuttall, UKIP MEP for the North West of England. He now will contest in February’s Stoke Central by-election after it was triggered by the labour party following the resignation of former labour MP Tristram Hunt.

It also stated that Jeremy Corbyn had won the leadership election for Labour, beating contestant Owen Smith to hold his spot as The Labour Party leader. Tristram Hunt was a known critic of Corbyn, hence partly why he resigned, as well as former Copeland MP Jamie Reed who’s resignation has triggered a by-election in Copeland on the same day as Stoke Central, 23rd February.

The Liberal Democrats have shown a resurgence of late winning multiple council elections and the Parliamentary by-election in Richmond where new MP Sarah Olney beat former Conservative MP, turned Independent Zac Goldsmith over the Heathrow Expansion row.  They are clearly aiming to appeal to remain voters after constantly addressing the issues of leaving the EU and critiquing the Conservative Governments Brexit plans.

But how has the following come to fruition?

Simply, you could argue one word has created this change. Brexit.

The country voted for Brexit on June 23rd, and despite numerous of stories and attempts for a Veto on Brexit; including a high court lawsuit against the Government to allow a Parliamentary vote on Article 50, it’s happening sooner than later.

The September/October summary also expanded on how Prime Minister Theresa May has promised Brexit will happen by March 2017.  This is now inevitably going to happen sometime in late March, early April time.

Article 50 will be triggered and the UK is leaving the EU.

Theresa May has stated already that the UK must leave the single market, tighten immigration into the UK and be a world leader in free-trade. 

She has also proclaimed that the two+ year process that Article 50 gives towards leaving the EU, will be heavily negotiated to put the UK first.

She now wants free-trade trade deals for the UK across the globe with other nations as a consequence of leaving the single market the EU allows access members to.

This all sounds rather promising and encouraging despite what critics say. Some say it’s easier said than done, some say it can be done, but it won’t be easy.

It for sure won’t be easy. The UK will now have to intensely lobby the EU to allow the UK to leave with as many benefits as possible. The reason it will be tough, is due to the so-called bureaucracy and stubbornness the EU has in place and the fact they won’t let the UK have to many benefits from Brexit, in case other eurosceptic nations follow suit to a Brexit in there own way.

This is why the UK is accepting it has to leave the single market. There is little to no chance of keeping free market status, if the UK is wanting to stop the freedom of movement into the State. That is a simple fact.

So what will the UK hope to look like post Brexit come 2018/2019 or beyond? In summary:

  • The UK will be officially independent and out of the EU.
  • The freedom of movement into the UK will be stopped.
  • The UK will be out of the Single Market.
  • The UK will begin or expand on free-trade deals globally.
  • The UK will begin to open trade deals with the EU states, hoping to be Tariff and Tax free.
  • The UK will prepare for the 2020 General Election.

That is a basic summary of what the UK will want to look like according to the Prime Minister Theresa May. Will this be the case? It’s very difficult to say. But optimism is essential and the Government will need to go into talks with the EU representing not only the people who voted to leave, but the people who wanted to remain also.

This is going to be the one of the most difficult and uncertain times in UK political history, especially since the 1st and 2nd World War’s.

Not only that, but the UK itself finds themselves in a battle to keep itself together, especially after Scotland’s Leader Nicola Sturgeon is undoubtably going to attempt to trigger another Scottish Independence Referendum before the new decade, after their access to the free-market will be stopped.

Turbulence is undoubtedly expected, but as stated, the UK will leave the EU in some form.

The question is, how do you think the UK will get on both during negotiations, and post negotiations with the EU? 

Will we acquire good trade deals globally?

Will Scotland become independent? 

Will the Conservatives win the 2020 General Election?

Will UKIP be relevant over the next 4-5 years?

Comment your views on Brexit, the UK, UK parties during the Brexit process and a possible Scottish Referendum below

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September & Early October Overview of all the main Political Stories

ThePoliticsView has had a short hiatus during the months of September and October. The reasons being the editor took time off to amend personal matters.

This blog should provide an overview of the main political stories that have occurred since the last published article, when Diane James was appointed the new UKIP leader back in early September.

Speaking of which, she has ended up stepping down from the UKIP leadership role just 18 days after being elected. She reportedly felt hard done by as leader, meaning she couldn’t coney her opinions freely within the party. Nigel Farage has stood in as temporary leader until a new leader is elected over the coming weeks.

The favourite Steven Woolfe has recently been out into hospital after a psychical altercation with another party MEP in Strasbourg. An investigation is now underway to deal with the issue, but Mr Woolfe has now been sent home from the hospital and is recovering well. He’s still considering running for UKIP leadership status as well as MEP Bill Etheridge who came 3rd behind Lisa Duffy and Diane James respectively in the last UKIP leadership election.

Theresa May and her new UK government have solidified the promised Brexit outcome from June’s referendum result by announcing article 50 will be triggered by early next March in 2017. All parties held their respective conferences over the past few months, and during the Conservative’s conference, she outlined her plans for brexit to occur and negotiations will continue to proceed towards structuring the UK’s plans for leaving the EU.

She also states that MP’s will not have a vote on the Tory’s outlined plans for triggering Article 50, and it will go ahead under the Conservatives ideals. This however, only means the negotiations will not be affected by MP’s, but they may have the final say upon the ‘final’ deal in place before the UK triggers article 50. More to come on that.

Jeremy Corbyn has retained his spot as Labour leader after beating his fellow competitor Owen Smith, winning just over 60% of the vote (61.8%). He has also since re-shaped Labours shadow cabinet and he wants to be a pivotal part of the brexit negotiations, as well as challenging the tories in the 2020 general election.

Finally, the last ‘major story’ over the past few weeks delves into the American Presidential race between Republican candidate Donald Trump and Democrat candidate Hilary Clinton. They have held the first few hustings, gaining millions of viewers worldwide, which have provided some interesting outcomes.

It’s reported that neither of them are winning outright in each hustings, but many feel Hilary Clinton is just edging them slightly over her rival Trump. Trump hasn’t been short of controversy in his debating skills, bringing up sexism, racism and prejudism into the fray through is ‘normalised’ bigoted views. Hilary herself has also been scrutinised for her deleted emails, ill well-being and behind the scenes issues by Trump, so both candidates are under heavy fire whilst trying to become president. The polls still have them neck and neck come November 8th (the date of the election) so more to come on that in the next few weeks.

What do you make of these major political stories over the past few weeks?

Is UKIP going to recover soon? Who will be their new leader? Will brexit be a success? Has Theresa May shown enough ambition fro Britain? Will Jeremy Corbyn be a success as Labour leader? Can they compete with the tories in 2020? Who do you think will be the next American President and why?

Comment below your views on any of the respective stories below

Brexit will go ahead, Government Officials announce

SOURCE: BBC

Today, the government have announced that it will ‘push ahead’ and start to work towards triggering Brexit without Parliamentary approval, according to Downing Street officials.

The statement comes after Theresa May’s cabinet gathered at Chequers (the Prime Ministers Country Escape), and after discussions ended, it was announced at Number 10 that an agreement between collective cabinet ministers that their is a need for a ‘unique’ deal for the UK to occur.

Furthermore, Mrs May told cabinet colleagues that their needs to be a focus on the ‘positive opportunities’ that lie outside the EU, as she reiterated there would be no second referendum.

The BBC have outlined that Mrs May has said the UK would not stay in the EU “by the back door”.

The Prime Minister has also said official talks with the rest of the EU will not begin this year.

The respective meeting at the PM’s country residence is clearly the most significant since the referendum vote in June to exit the EU. Despite reports of tensions and diverging priorities among key figures in the Cabinet, the process to leave will go ahead and the Referendum result will be respected.

Its reported that the Cabinet ministers were asked before their summer break’s to identify what were described as the “opportunities” best suited for their respective departments.

These talks are influential upon Mrs May’s empowering words that the government was clear that “Brexit means Brexit”.

She further commented in her speech that: “We will be looking at the next steps that we need to take and we will also be looking at the opportunities that are now open to us as we forge a new role for the UK in the world”

Despite these talks, the prime minister has said the UK government will not trigger Article 50 – the official mechanism for beginning the process of leaving the EU – ‘until the start of 2017 at the earliest.’

Once triggered, discussions over the terms of the UK’s exit will reportedly conclude in two years, unless all 28 members of the EU agree to extend them.

Wednesday’s cabinet meeting is seen as a major opportunity for Mrs May and senior colleagues to talk through the issues involved ahead of this weekend’s summit of G20 leaders in China.

What do you make of the Governments Brexit plans?

Is now the time to get the ball rolling with Brexit? How do you think the UK will negotiate it’s deals with the EU? What will the UK get out of these deals?

Comment your views on brexit below

Pro-Brexit MP Gisela Stuart claims ‘EU citizens are currently being left in limbo’ by the Government

SOURCE: BBC

One of the leading Vote Leave figures Gisela Stuart has said EU citizens in the UK have been “left in limbo” since the referendum result to leave the European Union.

Furthermore, the Labour MP is expected to head a research project on how to protect EU migrant rights after the UK leaves the EU.

It will be a cross-party inquiry for the British Future think tank to examine what kind of legal status’ could be granted to EU citizens in the UK, in time before the process to leave the EU starts by the inevitable triggering of Article 50.

Many Ministers have indicated strongly that they want to protect EU citizens’ status – as long as a reciprocal deal can be negotiated.

It’s reported that multiple MPs from all parties have attacked the government’s stance, saying people “are not bargaining chips”.

Ms Stuart, the former co-chair of the Vote Leave campaign, has stated the government should quickly outline that all EU citizens in the UK – about three million people – will be allowed to stay after Brexit.

She further states that the government should “take the initiative” and emphasize their intentions to protect UK-EU citizens’ rights and that it expected the same treatment for UK nationals abroad.

She also believes Ministers should demonstrate that leaving the EU “doesn’t mean that we’re ignoring people’s rights”.

Meanwhile, the Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron believes it’s “pretty shameful” for Ms Stuart to be “claiming to be worried” about the rights of EU citizens.

He said she had been part of a campaign that “whipped up anti-immigrant feeling” and “contributed to an increase of hate crimes against Europeans”.

“It is like the arsonist turning round and saying they are surprised that a fire took hold,” Mr Farron has said.

Lastly, David Davis, the newly named Brexit secretary by new Prime Minister Theresa May, will oversee the negotiations on the UK’s exit from the European Union, and has said that he wants to secure a “generous settlement” for both EU nationals in the UK, and British citizens abroad.

Ministers have said it would be “unwise” to fully “guarantee” EU citizens’ rights without a deal for Britons abroad.

What do you make of the uncertainty behind EU citizens rights living in the UK?

Do the government need to state and maintain transparent and accountable help towards EU migrants living in the UK quickly? Will the government fully help EU migrants living in the UK?

Comment your views on EU migrant rights below

Government ‘Guarantee’ post-EU funds after Brexit occurs

SOURCE: BBC

It has been announced today that EU funding, which the UK receives as a member that will consequently be lost after Brexit occurs, given to organisations involving farming, scientists and others, will be replaced by the Treasury, Chancellor Philip Hammond has said.

Brexit could cost up to £6bn a year in losses of funding, but the Treasury will guarantee to back EU-funded projects signed before this year’s Autumn Statement.

The BBC have stated that agricultural funding which is now provided by the EU will also continue until 2020.

However, critics said the guarantee does not go far enough and there was ‘continued uncertainty’.

Voters ultimately backed to leave the EU in the 23 June referendum by 3.8%, but Prime Minister Theresa May has indicated the UK government will not trigger Article 50, which would begin a two-year process to leave, during 2016.

Furthermore, Mr Hammond has said “EU structural and investment fund projects signed before the Autumn Statement later this year, and Horizon research funding granted before leaving the EU, will be guaranteed by the Treasury after the UK leaves.”

The BBC have also said ‘the EU’s 80bn euro (£69bn) Horizon 2020 programme awards funding for research and innovation and is open to UK institutions while the country remains a member.’

The chancellor responded to critics by saying the government was “determined to ensure that people have stability and certainty in the period leading up to our departure from the EU”.

The Treasury said it would assess whether to guarantee funding for certain other projects “that might be signed after the Autumn Statement, but while we remain a member of the EU”.

Currently, farmers receive subsidies and other payments under the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy (CAP).

It’s said that they get about £3bn a year in subsidies, with the biggest farmers pocketing cheques of £1m. The grants are given for owning land and also taking care of wildlife.

The National Farmers’ Union (NFU) said the Treasury’s announcement was “positive” for farming.

Other examples of projects that have received, or are due to receive regional development fund money, include:

  • £5m for the Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre at the University of Manchester
  • £9m for the manufacturing growth programme to support areas in the Midlands, Yorkshire and the Humber and the East of England
  • £3m for a new life sciences incubation and innovation centre at Porton Down in Wiltshire

(BBC 2016)

Reportedly, the UK currently pays money into the EU budget, which will stop once it formally leaves.

In 2015 the UK Government paid in £13bn; EU spending on the UK was £4.5bn, meaning the UK’s net contribution was estimated at about £8.5bn, or £161m a week.

The UK private sector receives a further £1-1.5bn annually in EU funding.

What do you make of the Governments post-EU promisees?

Is the affordable for the UK to do? Will this mean Taxation and further Austerity cuts? Are these promises realistic?

Comment below your views on the post-EU funding plans

Baroness Wheatcroft: “The House of Lords could delay Brexit”

SOURCE: BBC, Times

A Conservative peer named Baroness Wheatcroft, has come out and claimed that the House of Lords could ‘withhold’ the approval of Article 50, the vital mechanism that once triggered will start the process of the UK leaving the European Union.

However, there is still currently some disagreement over whether Article 50 would need to come before Parliament.

But former political journalist Baroness Wheatcroft said if it did, “the Lords might actually delay things”.

It’s said that the government has previously stated that Article 50 could be triggered through use of the royal prerogative.

Speaking to The Times, the former editor in chief of the Wall Street Journal Europe and the Sunday Telegraph said that she “hoped delays in the Lords of any potential Brexit legislation would lead to a second referendum.”

Furthermore, the BBC state that a legal challenge on whether the government can trigger Article 50 without the authorisation of Parliament will be heard in the High Court in the autumn.

Lady Wheatcroft has also said that she ‘did not want the Lords to stand in the way of the UK leaving the EU’ at the moment, but added: “However, if it comes to a bill, I think the Lords might actually delay things. I think there’s a majority in the Lords for remaining.”

Another question asked was whether she would support peers delaying Brexit legislation she said: “Yes I would”.

– “And I would hope, while we delayed things, that there would be sufficient movement in the EU to justify putting it to the electorate, either through a general election or a second referendum.”

What do you make of Baroness Wheatcroft’s claims?

Would the Lords delay or block the triggering of Article 50? Could a delay or block lead onto a 2nd Referendum? Would you like to see a 2nd referendum occur?

Comment below your views of Baroness Wheatcroft’s claims and Brexit so far

The Trident Weapons System has been renewed after MP’s vote 472-117 for it’s renewal

SOURCE: BBC

Tonight, MPs have heavily backed the renewal of the UK’s Trident nuclear weapons system, voting 472 to 117 in favour for it in Parliament.

The vote has now approved the manufacture of four replacement submarines at an estimated cost of £31bn.

The Defence Secretary Michael Fallon spoke to MPs in the house, saying nuclear threats were growing around the world and Trident ‘puts doubts in the minds of our adversaries’.

The Labour party was split over the issue with many of its MPs defying leader Jeremy Corbyn and backing the government.

Although Labour MPs were given a free vote, many used the occasion to attack Mr Corbyn, who is a longstanding opponent of nuclear weapons. The BBC has quoted that ‘60% of Labour’s MPs voted in favour of Trident renewal.’

Furthermore, the BBC have said that the SNP ‘opposed the move’, saying nuclear weapons were ‘immoral’ and the continued stationing of submarines on the Clyde could accelerate moves towards independence.

The vote saw a majority of 355 for trident renewal and was announced at the end of a five-hour debate, in which Prime Minister Theresa May spoke at the despatch box for the first time as prime minister.

Mrs May said it would be an ‘act of gross irresponsibility’ for the UK to abandon the continuous-at-sea weapons system.

Although preparatory work on renewal is already under way, Monday’s vote will give the final green light to a new fleet of submarines which are due to come into service by the early 2030s.

Mr Fallon has also spoken to say Trident had ‘helped protect the UK for more than 50 years’ and to disown it now would be to ‘gamble the long-term security of our citizens’.

The UK has faced growing threats from rogue nations, such as North Korea, as well as a more assertive Russia, he said.

“Nuclear weapons are here, they are not going to disappear,” Mr Fallon furthered. “It is the role of government to make sure we can defend ourselves against them.”

What’s your view of the Trident renewal?

Was it the best choice for the future of the UK’s defence matters? Is it to expensive to fund? Will it serve to be a ‘good’ decision for the UK overtime? What do you make of the overwhelming majority for it’s renewal?

Comment below your views on the trident renewals 

Theresa May’s newly appointed Cabinet

SOURCE: BBC

Theresa May has finalised her cabinet as the new UK Prime Minister, by shuffling, firing and hiring across her whole Cabinet team, including the ‘big’ jobs of Chancellor of the Exchequer, Foreign Secretary and Home Secretary.

Those fired include George Osborne, Michael Gove, John Whittingdale, Nicky Morgan and Oliver Letwin.

With all of the key cabinet appointments now announced, we can see how Prime Minister Theresa May has balanced her cabinet for the brexit negotiations and for the next few years. Here’s the list of the cabinet:

International Trade Secretary – Liam Fox 

Chancellor of the Exchequer – Philip Hammond

Foreign Secretary – Boris Johnson

Home Secretary – Amber Rudd

Defence Secretary – Michael Fallon

Health Secretary – Jeremy Hunt

Secretary of State for Exiting the EU – David Davis

Justice Secretary – Liz Truss

Education Secretary – Justine Greening

Secretary of State for International Trade – Liam Fox

Transport Secretary – Chris Grayling

Chief Whip – Gavin Williamson

Conservative Party chairman – Patrick McLoughlin

Leader of the House of Lords – Baroness Evans

Leader of the House of Commons -David Lidington

Culture Secretary – Karan Brady

International Development -Priti Patel

Communities and Local Government – Sajid Javid

Work and Pensions – Dominic Green

Scottish Secretary – David Mundell

Welsh Secretary – Alan Cairns

Northern Ireland Secretary – James Brokenshire

2nd placed Andrea Leadsman in the tory party race has earned herself the spot as Environment secretary. 

Controversial Jeremy Hunt maintains his spot as the Health Secretary.

Boris Johnson is the new Foreign Secretary which is a surprise to many after his Vote Leave campaigning and claims by people saying he constantly ‘lied’.

Amber Rudd replaces the new Prime Minister Theresa May as Home Secretary.

David Davis has been announced as the first ever ‘Brexit Secretary’ that will help lead the negotiations for the UK exit from the European Union.

Dr Liam Fox also becomes the first ever ‘International Trade Secretary’, so it is clear that it has been a Brexit motivated cabinet shuffle by Theresa May. ‘Brexit is Brexit’ after all.

What do you make of the newly made changes to the Conservative cabinet of UK Governance?

Will these newly appointed Cabinet MP’s get the best ‘Brexit’ outcomes for the UK, in terms of mainly trade? Who else would you have rather seen enter the Cabinet and in what roles? Is the UK now set to negotiate an EU exit?

Comment below your views on the new conservative cabinet and brexit 

David Cameron steps down as PM as Theresa May immediatley takes over

SOURCE: BBC

Today the Prime Minister David Cameron resigned from his post after accepting his defeat in the EU Referendum and choosing to inevitably step down for another to become leader. That person who won the chance to become the new Prime Minister was Theresa May just days after becoming one of two potential successors in what was going to be a head-to-head race to the leadership with Andrea Leadsman.

However, Ms Leadsom chose to stand down from the race on Monday, allowing the only remaining candidate, the former Home Secretary and party-popular Theresa May to win the race early, thus becoming Conservative part leader and Prime Minister.

In her first speech outside downing street as Prime Minister, she announced according to the BBC that she vowed to create a country that works for all not just the ‘privileged few’ and that it’s ”her mission to ‘build a better Britain’.

She further promised to give people who were ‘just managing’ and ‘working around the clock’ more control over their lives.

Mrs May is the UK’s second female prime minister, after Margaret Thatcher.

So what is on her to do list over the next few months?

  • Form a Cabinet: Mrs May will have to choose who she sits alongside around the Cabinet table. The most important appointments – chancellor, foreign secretary and home secretary – are expected to be announced on Wednesday with a fuller government reshuffle following over the next couple of days.
  • Trident Renewal: Her first meeting will be to discuss the Trident renewal and whether the UK should pay to renew it’s trident regimes. A very delicate subject to discuss and vote on.
  • Brexit Talks: Obviously, the UK has voted to leave the EU and she will now have to lead the talks on when article 50 should be triggered to get the process moving. She will have to also appoint a expert team into helping with negotiations in what will be a very firm brussels to negotiate with.
  • Clarify when the next General Election is: Theresa May has already said that she doesn’t want to have a snap general election due to it’s negative effects on an already ‘uncertain’ and ‘unstable’ economy. She will expected to announced the next general election to be held in 2020 as planned before.

What are your views of Theresa May becoming Prime Minister?

Is she the right choice? Will she succeed in the role? Will she successfully lead the UK out of the EU with the best possible outcomes such as gaining free trade? What did you make of David Cameron’s 6 year stint as Prime Minister?

Comment below YOUR views on Theresa May and David Cameron

Conservative Leadership: Theresa May and Andrea Leadsman go head to head

SOURCE: BBC

Today, the conservative MPs have voted for Theresa May and Andrea Leadsom to become the new Conservative Party Leader, thus new Prime minister of the UK.

They will go head to head to become the next leader of the Conservative Party, after Michael Gove was eliminated from the contest.

Results

After the second MPs’ ballot, Home Secretary Mrs May finished with 199 votes, Energy Minister Mrs Leadsom 84 and the Justice Secretary Mr Gove, finished with 46.

The new tory leader will be announced after campaigning on September 9th, with Theresa May going into it strong with a clear 115 point victory over 2nd placed Andrea Leadsom.

It all came about when the current Prime Minister David Cameron resigned after finishing on the ‘losing side’ in the UK’s EU referendum, in which the UK voted to leave by a margin of 3.8%.

The results were announced at Westminster by Conservative MP Graham Brady, the chairman of the backbench 1922 Committee.

There had originally been five contenders to succeed Mr Cameron, with MPs voting in two rounds to get that number down to two.

The contest now moves to its final stage with the Conservative Party’s 150,000-strong membership deciding between Mrs May, a Remain campaigner with a long track record in government, and Mrs Leadsom, a leading light of the Brexit campaign who has stressed her City and business background.

Those that want to vote and are eligible has to have been a member of the Conservative Party by 9 June.

Polling expert Professor John Curtice, of Strathclyde University, said the electorate for the contest represented a “very distinctive slice of Britain”.

They would be mostly over 50, disproportionately male, and “overwhelmingly middle class”, he said.

He predicted the Brexit debate would “play a role” in the contest, but not a defining one.

Both candidates have been linked to euroscepticism, so could be the best choices on offer.

What do you make of the Tory leadership race? Are the right two in place to become the next UK and tory leader? Should another candidate still be in the race? Who will go on to become the new Prime Minister and why?

Comment below YOUR views of the conservative leadership race